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Will you people stop crashing your P3s into Trees!

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by BenDronePilot, Jul 10, 2015.

  1. BenDronePilot

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    You have no idea how frustrating it is watching people needlessly, carelessly, recklessly crashing their Phantom 3s into trees and buildings. It's so incredibly avoidable if you don't jump into flying beyond your ability as a newb pilot as well as using a little common sense.

    Here are some preventative steps you can take to prevent a newb crash into a tree or building.

    1) Read the FULL manual and I don't mean the quick start guide to the point you have a decent understanding of your new Phantom.

    2) If you have an IOS Device first fly using the built in flight simulator inside the DJI Pilot app.

    3) If you're new to flying do NOT fly near trees or in confined spaces. Until you've got a reasonably good understanding of how to fly keep it in a wide open grassy area which will minimize damage if something did fail.

    4) Calibrate your compass the first time you fly only in an open field preferably with grass underneath you to minimize the chances of power lines or other sources of interference. Do not however calibrate your compass every time you fly. It it not necessary and can introduce it's own problems. Only recalibrate if you see your Phantom flying in what's called a Toilet Bowl effect, if you see a compass error message, or if you change the area you're flying in by a significant distance, i'd say at least 50 miles.

    5) As a new pilot you should mainly fly your Phantom nose pointed away from you, with you behind the quad copter. That way as you get used to the flight characteristics left will always be left and right right. It eliminates the confusion of the nose facing in or being sideways which completely alters the corrective movements you would need to make to avoid something.

    6) Flying an aircraft is not like driving a car. There are delayed reactions. If you need to stop it will not stop on a dime. Air craft take time to slow down from the moment you release the controls, that applies both to decent as well as forward flight.

    7) Set your RTH Altitude higher than any obstacle you may possibly encounter in your flight area, such as nearby trees or buildings. That way if you do fly behind something and trigger an RTH your Phantom will gain enough altitude to fly over anything it may hit on the way back to the home point.

    8) Upon initial take off stay put and hover at least 6 feet or more off the ground for a minute or so to make sure that the Phantom is behaving as it should. Battery is as it should. GPS sats and such are good. Many a time if something is going to go wrong or show a hint of it, it's within this first minute or two of testing.

    9) If anything, the controls, etc don't seem to be reacting as they should then immediately land, don't take off higher or father. Recycle the power and start again.

    10) Fly slow at first, not pushing the air craft too fast. Keep away from tight or confined spaces. if the only convenient areas you have to fly do have too many nearby obstacles then fly above anything you may hit.

    11) The antennas on your remote should be parallel together and pointed straight up at the sky, the sides of the antennas always facing the Phantom. This will ensure optimal signal. The weakest transmission comes from the tips of the antennas.

    12) Fly in line of seight of the Phantom ALWAYS. That ideally means that you should have absolutely no obstructions between your Radio Control and your Phantom. This is especially critical if flying at further distances. The further away you fly, the higher you will also need to go to keep the signal strong as any obstacles between you and your Phantom that were not in the way of line of sight now suddenly will be at long range.

    13) If flying at very high altitude directly above yourself. You now need to change the orientation of the antennas so they are not facing up, but down so the sides of the antennas reach the Phantom. It's really best not to fly too high directly above the location your standing because it will always be the point of weakest transmission. As the signal coming from the bottom of the Phantoms legs / antennas is going to be the weakest. You should always keep a little distance from your standing point.

    14) Do not full speed descend straight down. You end up flying into your own prop wash which will cause turbulence and instability. The safest way to descend is during forward flight, or sideways it doesn't matter, just not straight down at full speed.

    15) do not move both of your sticks to both corners at the same time. this is called a CSC and will auto shut down your motors regardless of where or how high you are flying.

    16) Be very mindful of where you are flying the Phantom, what is beside it and above it. Don't do silly things like aimlessly flying backwards or sideways without first knowing that there is a clear path in that direction.

    There you go, some of the more important points to keep in mind as a newb pilot. Granted there is more I can say but I covered some of the major bullet points. If there's anything you'd like to add feel free to chime in. There are also some pilot training material on DJI's web site with things and exercises you can do to learn orientation of your air craft such as practicing doing circles, then figure 8's and so forth. Until it's second nature knowing where you are and how to do a corrective movement regardless of which direction you are facing.
     
    #1 BenDronePilot, Jul 10, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2015
  2. silverstoned83

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    How about mastering LOS flying prior to relying on the FPV perspective? It took me quite a long time to master this. I can only imagine how easily new pilots rely on the video feed without thinking about how much different line of sight flying is.

    Edit: just found the part in your post where you mentioned that.
     
  3. BenDronePilot

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    Yes and that's a BIG problem. Many newb pilots will take off excited doing little to nothing of what I mention above and only relying on the video feed and Panicing if it turns or pauses for any reason. I can not stress and emphasize enough how important it is to know how to control the Phantom from line of sight and not via the FPV feed. That way it really wont matter if you do or do not have the video feed active. You will always know how to get your Phantom where you want it.
     
  4. KImR

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    BenDronePilot,
    As a new pilot who has been cautious, careful, learning by experience after reading and watching everything I can find but knows a simple mistake (I made one and was lucky) could be an expensive or dangerous mistake... Good Advise! Thank you.
     
  5. Julius717

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    The tree shot first.
     
    dirkclod likes this.
  6. BenDronePilot

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    *sings* I shot the Phantom... but I didn't shoot the In-Spire.... :p *note* "I" being the "tree" :p
     
  7. phantomized

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    sometimes, in urban areas, line of sight is just not possible at all times. if i am trying to shoot a video at a certain angle of a certain building or a scenic route, i need my fpv to know what it will look like, kind of like a rehearsal. but i do understand the importance of LOS, just being able to see my bird makes me feel way more comfortable. my video feed cuts off sometimes, i do get nervous but it comes back. when i do lose line of sight and fpv feed, i do not panic, i know she is waiting for me exactly where i left her, i adjust my antennas, walk around and it fixes. sometimes, we lose LOS, just like fpv feed.
     
    acherman likes this.
  8. BenDronePilot

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    When learning to fly initially you need to be flying close and well aware of how to control your Phantom regardless of nose orientation.

    And my point about line of sight was about the transmitter being in line of sight of the Phantom so you don't loose control signal by accident. That may trigger an RTH and cause your bird to fly right into a building or tree. It's good to have RTH just in case of emergency but it's not something I would rely on as a crutch in case something goes amiss. I could see maybe using RTH for the fun of it while I do actually have a visual and control of the Phantom so if it does malfunction I can at least cancel and take over.
     
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  9. phantomized

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    I hear you. I set my RTH way above any obstacles and cancel the RTH whenever I get the warning. I've set my bird to 200 meters max alt although in canada 90 meters is the highest we are supposed to fly. But I set it like that for safety reasons, and its better to break a law and no harm done than to follow the law and smash in to someones living room on the 27th floor of a condo. similar to like speeding with a vehicle, sometimes you need to speed up to avoid an accident, although you may have broken the law, you may have saved lives and insurance claims, right?
     
  10. dedstik

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    I witnessed a P3 vs tree incident just recently (the tree won)...

    The pilot had never flown any RC aircraft of any kind prior to flying his P3. I believe he said it was his second day flying his quad. His P3 was eventually retrieved from the tree with minimal damage.

    With the advent of the P3 DJI has effectively removed any "barrier to entry" for anyone wanting to fly a quadcopter (I do not use the D word). Just look at the auto take-off and RTH off functions...you don't even need to know how to arm the P3 let alone land it. I helped another new P3 owner who was trying to calibrate his compass by rotating his RC controller and not his P3 !

    While I applaud DJI's advancement of technology I see the pitfalls with new pilots all the time.

    Take a look at the questions that asked repeatedly and patiently answered on this forum. Most, if not all, could be answered with the response: RTFM.

    If all you need to fly a P3 is a credit card and a local park what do you expect...?

    :harry
     
  11. KImR

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    Wow! Some have nearly wore out the "RTFM". IMHO there is but very little in the entire manual.
    I suppose no waste of time in reading it even if you only pick up one thing from it or... as it worked for me and
    reading it left me with more questions then when I started reading it.
    To say the least the Phantom 3 Owners Manual is "malnourished".
    If you do not look for more information then what is in that manual before flying a new Phantom 3 then...
    you may be a fool. Just saying...
     
  12. snerd

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    Hey! I resemble that remark!! :D
     
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  13. taroh

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    Also up/downwards. I have bad experience when rely on FPV and go upwards... Rather backwards is safe, the way she came.
     
  14. BenDronePilot

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    Yep, this is a big reason why you see so many "crashed my" copter videos on youtube. They're excited new flyers who jump right into flying, barely reading the quick start guide let alone the manual. Compass calibrating where they shouldn't be. And then flying beyond their means, loosing orientation and flying into a wall or the ground. That's also why my #1 point is read the manual, before everything else. Even if it's not full understood they will be further along than 90% of the youtube crash videos out there.
     
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  15. BenDronePilot

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    You're welcome, and it sounds like you're doing the right things and taking it step by step. I'm glad you found my post helpful :)
     
  16. BenDronePilot

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    RTFM can never be stated or over stated enough. Even if you've skimmed over the full downloadable manuals and flight school info on DJI's web site and understood only parts. You are still well ahead of the majority of the people who crash on their first or second flight out because they barely skimmed the quick start manual let alone anything else.
     
  17. Cyclone

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    I always thought it was the trees that jumped out on you and not us crashing into them. :D

    Very nice guide!!
     
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  18. sergekouper

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    And you think you are reasonable?
    1- If your local authority set up the rules at 90m is precisely for safety reasons, not to restrict your fun. Do you think about the other users, helicos, gliders, micros... they have their own rules as well and may conflict with what you authorize yourself to do.
    2- You are not supposed to fly in congested areas, so you should not fear to hit a building on the 27th floor. you have no business to be there.
    3- RTH and failsafe are not a way to pilot but a part of emergency procedures.

    Just saying.
     
    #18 sergekouper, Jul 11, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2015
  19. challenger451

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    I would add not to fly indoors without logging a lot of hours and knowing your craft very well. I survived a pretty hard crash inside a church, and have the scars to show. Just glad the church wasn't damaged. I found that drifting seems to occur more inside buildings and correction time is almost nil.

    I think we will see soon, liability contracts for flying around places that can be damaged or people hurt.
     
  20. challenger451

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    By the way, what is your advice on flying IOC? I found early on it helped me manage the direction my bird was flying.