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The Truth About The Part 107 Written Test...

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations' started by RemotePilot101, Sep 1, 2016.

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  1. RemotePilot101

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    Let me start by saying the test is legit. A lot of our customers thought we were crazy and perhaps “over-preparing” them with knowledge they wouldn’t need but nothing could be further from the truth.

    We’ve been helping pilots of manned aircraft prepare for FAA written tests for 10 years so we know how the FAA can be when it comes to testing.

    If you think just reading the Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (PHAK) will do it (a 600 page tome mind you) or the FAA study guide they send when you sign up for the test - - which is good, but only scratches the surface - - you’ll be setting yourself up for failure.

    The test is SO HEAVY in VFR Sectional Charts, Airspace, METARS, TAFs, and scenario based questioning.

    They even go as far to ask about sUAS stall characteristics with an aft CG and performance based on load factor.

    For example could you read this TAF?

    KOKC 051130Z 0512/0618 14008KT 5SM BR BKN030
    TEMPO 0513/0516 1 1/2SM BR
    FM051600 18010KT P6SM SKC
    BECMG 0522/0524 20013G20KT 4SM SHRA OVC020
    PROB40 0600/0606 2SM TSRA OVC008CB
    BECMG 0606/0608 21015KT P6SM SCT040=

    Thats one of the actual TAF’s used on the test. A question might read “What is the weather expected to be at OKC for a flight at 10:00 local?” (Expecting you to know how to convert that into Zulu Time.)

    It’s not the kind of test most of us could just show up to and get a passing score.

    I’m not here to just push our course on anyone, I’m here to deliver value and make us all safer more capable pilots. This is real world info you’ll be using to submit for certificate’s of wavier and make smart flying decisions. Our course is your course for life so come 2 years from now when you need to test again it’s yours.

    A lot of the folks in this forum have used Remote Pilot 101 to pass the written test and I’m sure if you have more questions they would be happy to share.

    I encourage you all whether you choose our course or not to study it hard and get a real understanding of the material not just a rote memorization.

    Jason Schappert
    RemotePilot101.com
     
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  2. ExcObs1

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    10:00 local am/pm?
     
  3. Richard R

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    Or what time zone? Nothing in the TAF would tell you that. Doesn't seem a likely way to pose the question.
     
  4. ExcObs1

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    I'll play...if there's an answer that is " 1 1/2 mile vis with mist " that's what I'm choosing

    Hopefully Russ Still will be proud :)
     
  5. IronReel

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    I agree you do need come prepared, but I don't think anyone on the computer exam would have to convert ZULU to Local time because it's a RANDOM bank of questions and the system isn't going to be looking at the time zone of where I am taking the test and then have answers that know that. My TAF question with that example would be more along the lines of "what would your visibility be at 17:00z in Statute Miles"
     
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  6. ExcObs1

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    True...but I do see how a question could be framed like that (but with more info as we pointed out)

    My previous answer would change if we were at Standard time.

    Regardless, I think its creating positive dialog concerning the areas of study.
     
  7. Phil Tuggle

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    [QUOTE="...I’m not here to just push our course on anyone...[/QUOTE]

    Okay then, Jason, I WILL DO IT FOR YOU! This is a great course, and I am certain I would not have scored as high as I did, without it.

    Two pieces of advise you will be smart to heed...
    1.
    IF you take Jason's course, take the practice 60-question final exam he provides AT LEAST three times. As he will tell you, the question bank is huge.
    2.
    Take a small magnifying glass or strong reading glasses! The computer monitor for the exam may have poor resolution no matter what the zoom factor, and the supplemental Figure binder (matches the computer monitor, in paper form) may have very low resolution photocopies within it. Mine did in both cases and it was only by dumb luck that the Proctor found a magnifying glass for me in the final 30 minutes of the test. Whew - I went back and corrected some mistakes on smudgy radio frequencies.
     
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  8. lynxpilot

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    Requiring knowledge of TAFs and ERFs for a vehicle that is operated in LOS is ridiculous. That may not bear any relevance to your business because you only train people to comply with the laws, but the laws are ridiculous. If you operate a CIA drone that crosses national borders and weighs thousands of pounds and carries hellfire missiles, it might be relevant. Otherwise, you just look outside and see that there's no rain to short out your motor windings and you go fly.

    This whole Part 107 thing is just another federal government usurpation of rights undefined and which the federal government has absolutely no authority under the 10th Amendment.
     
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  9. Phil Tuggle

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    ...This whole Part 107 thing is just another federal government usurpation of rights undefined and which the federal government has absolutely no authority under the 10th Amendment.

    That used to bug me (a lot) too, but it finally became evident that it was/is under the interstate commerce clause that so many regulations of what we do has come into play; this is why the FAA (and just about all other Federal departments and agencies) can assert itself in the world of potential "interstate commerce." My assumption, anyway.

    Beyond that, I think it is actually a fairly good idea - call it a security blanket - to know 107 Pilots conform to some kind of body of knowledge and behavior standards, even if some of it is maybe a wee bit extraneous. Ridiculous seems a little too strong of a word to me. Knowledge is generally a good thing.
     
    #9 Phil Tuggle, Sep 1, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2016
  10. lynxpilot

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    I don't fly my drone across state lines and even if I did, it wouldn't be for commercial purposes. Therefore, I am not subject to the "commerce" clause. I fly my drone safely, so I'm also not subject to the "general welfare" clause. The more we subject ourselves to this crap, the more we will become slaves to the federal government. Those who will sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.
     
  11. Phil Tuggle

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    Roger that. I was curious (it's a curse), so looked up the origin of FAA's authority over (and definition of) the NAS. Pretty much given to the the FAA when it was first created in 1958 when it was authorized to take care of things [my words] in all of the navigable airspace of the nation (yep, that includes from take of to landing) for the sake of safety. Looks like they have authority over anything manmade dynamically supported by the air and even the ground-based services and most of the real estate related to that. That is A LOT of authority. I guess states and individual citizens still own authority over some soil, roads, and waterways and such...just not much of the air, unless a state says so.
     
    #11 Phil Tuggle, Sep 1, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2016
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  12. Seawolf

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    Apparently with the exception of cities who think they have the right to ban airspace use.
     
  13. BobUnplugged

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    I passed my test on Wednesday, and the IACRA website had my test in there this morning (Friday). I will have my temporary certificate in 2-4 days according to the website.

    The test was hard. Comparing my questions to others, it is quite apparent as described above that there are a LOT of different questions, so you have to know the subject, not the questions. The sectional charts were hard to read. I had to take the book to a brighter part of the room to see well enough. I had no METAR or TAF/CTAF questions.

    I'm glad it's over.
     
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  14. tgmaverick

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    If the laws regarding part 107 get changed, will these changes be included in the course (2, 4, 6 years from now etc.) so we can use it every time we need to test again?
     
  15. joet

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    The clause applies to the Federal Government and its ability to regulate commerce, so the assertion that you aren't subject to it is meaningless.
     
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  16. Phil Tuggle

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    Wow! It seems more than a few have had almost zero TAF questions - I had at least FIVE. Study EVERYTHING, rinse, repeat! If you have access to practice tests that draw from the FAA questions database, TAKE IT no less than 3 times! I promise, it will be quite different each time. There is not that much danger of getting below a 70, but don't you at least want to be in the high 80's? By the way, there are MANY questions that have seemingly very little to do with UAVs.

    This is no walk in the park. My 2 cents.
     
    #16 Phil Tuggle, Sep 2, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2016
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  17. maeflower

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    True it's no walk in the park but if you study, it's really not too bad. You just have to know the stuff! No night before cramming will get it. I knew nothing about any of this 2 months ago. Knew nothing about drones and had never touched a drone 2 months ago. Studied like crazy the UAV Coach Drone Pilot Ground School material for a month and passed with an 87%. Soooo any of you can do it no problem IF you study the material.
     
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  18. turbulence

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    Knowledge of TAFs ridiculous for drone usage? You gonna fly your drone when the TAF says:

    20025G40KT 2SM SHRA OVC020
     
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  19. nightpirate

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    Excellent POINT! TAKE A MAGNIFYING GLASS! They gave me the supplement charts in a handbook and two pieces of blank paper, however, I had to borrow their MGlass to see anything in the handbook.
     
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  20. nightpirate

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    I took a pre-course at an aviation school, which turned out to be worthless.

    There are probably hundreds of questions that are randomly selected by the CATS system to serve up the official 60, thus every test is most likely different. IMO here is what you need to study for:
    • Be sure to understand "Airspace Classifications; especially D through G.
    • The majority of my test had a lot of chart work. You need to know how to find Latitude / Longitude and the minutes. There was no conversion to decimal as it was all old school, however, you should know if they ask how to convert the minutes into decimal. Simple, just divide by 60.
    • Understand where to find the various radio frequencies / identifiers on a chart and the differences between them, i.e. which acronym does what. ASOS / AWOS vs UNICOM vs ATIS etc.
    • Have an understanding about weather and specifically how it pertains to aeronautics and aircraft performance.
    • Understand the simple 400ft rule, unless you're within 400' of a structure, and then your altitude is can be has high as the structure as long as you're not violating the cloud-clearance requirements of 500' vertically (based on your AGL) and 2000' horizontally.
    • Understand the difference between AGL and MSL and when they apply.
    • Understand when you need ATC permission to fly in a certain airspace classification and what your restrictions are, and when, in MOA.
    • Know how to read a METAR.
    • Know ADM / CRM and the nuances between them.
    I studied for about 14 hrs over two days, right before the test. I found the test more difficult than I had expected, no thanks to the class instruction that was extremely poor. For whatever reason, I went here (it's free), and studied everything, along with watching the videos. I got an 85%.
    Sarah Nilsson - Aviation

    Best of luck.

    Peace & God bless....
     

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