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Any disabled quad pilots here?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by LUISMARTINEZ, Jul 11, 2015.

  1. LUISMARTINEZ

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    Thanks to a stroke 2 years ago my left arm and hand have limited mobility. Been flying a Syma X5C using only my right hand switching back and forth from the joysticks as needed, and also putting a lot of hours in the Phoenix RC simulator. It is not elegant flying but it works.

    My new P3P arrived a week ago but due to house guest and a business trip it is still in the box. The good folks at Total Control Innovations (Tempe, AZ) conducted a complete function check and showed me how to do the IMU and calibration. So my first flight is going to be Monday.

    I was curious if there were any other disabled flyers here with tips.
     
    Ken Cruise likes this.
  2. Don York

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    Hey Luis, p3 pilot here, left hemi-parisis 10 yrs. ago. Not the smoothest kid on the block, but so far I've kept it out of the trees! Simulators are a good start. I've found if you can be seated with the controller resting in your lap one handed opts are somewhat easier. Fortunately not many maneuvers call for simultaneous stick movement, particularly if the flight does not call for intricate inputs. Since the FAA won't allow me to pilot a Cessna anymore this is as close as I can get to the sky these days. Good luck to you and remember frustration is a by-product of stroke and it must be left home as it adds nothing to your flying but more frustration. I look forward to hearing about that first flight. Be well and enjoy your toy
     
  3. LUISMARTINEZ

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    So glad to hear from another pilot w/ physical challenges; thought I was alone. I have a commercial pilot license but stopped flying 35 yrs. ago when I became a cop, couldn't afford it. I applied for my FAA 333 exemption a week ago, as it seems no one in my city (pop. 45k in the Southwest, very active real estate market) is doing commercial work and a potential market exist. Looks like the FAA is requiring any exemptions it grants to have a pilot's license and be current (biannual flight review).

    I am trying to figure out how to do that and have contacted several CFIs and they all seemed perplexed when I tell them I have no desire to fly a plane!!! Looks like I may be able to do the flight portion of the BFR in a simulator. We'll see. The 333 approval takes 4 months so there's no rush. Thanks for the reply Don.
     
  4. IflyinWY

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    Ya'll aren't alone. Here's another fellow who is in the same boat, so to speak.
    http://www.phantompilots.com/threads/wheelchair-pilot.47101/

    A bunch of decades ago, we used to call it "Wheels and Wings". That was airplanes though. :D

    Welcome to the party folks. Especially impressive first post Don York.

    Check out my signature for some helpful links. You may also like to see what I have done at www.wynotweb.com. It's a bit off the beaten path, but some good info. :)
     
    #4 IflyinWY, Jul 12, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2015
  5. BlackHawk388

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    I was exposed to a large blast in Iraq in 2003. By health records and doctors estimate I had 7-9 small stroke events before surgery. Then, in 2007, was in my house when an F4 tornado destroyed it. Had surgeries on my left shoulder and left knee due to injuries from that experience. Spent a total of 8 months in physical therapy/ occupational rehab after that. Worked my *** off and luckily, now have decent use of my left side.

    Most of my issues now are 75% loss of feeling on left side, 30% loss of strength and 50% reduction in fine motor movement. Also, I can have rather sudden cognitive and balance issues due to surgery affecting the right parietal lobe. I do OK though. Determination makes for a demanding task master of oneself. And GPS hovering/lateral abilities of this P2V+ helps in such situations.

    Lot's of time on simulators. Lots of time on fixed and rotary wing R/C craft. Have done my share of repairs too. ;)

    For me, the biggest thing is constant exposure. Either by simulator or real life. Muscle memory is key because I lose it so quickly without lots of time on sticks. I'm often looking down at the controller to make sure my left hand is doing what I expect it to be doing and I use a neck strap for the TX as well. Sometimes I get small, very short duration "focal point" seizures on my left side and at those times, I have to make sure my left hand comes off the TX and I'm ready to do both sticks with just my right hand. This P2V+ allows for that. Not so much with my other aircraft. Which is why I've gotten rid of all but one helicopter, a Blade SR120 that requires repair....again....and my two powered gliders.

    The best course of action is to know when to say when or when to stay off the controls. Knowing your limits and then, adapting to them. Always seeking out ways of mitigating/circumventing the problems. I'm probably one of the most cautious fliers due to this. I try my best not to consider myself disabled. Rather, I choose to mentally say I'm am more challenged. I've always liked a good challenge and never backed down from one.

    From one flyer with challenges to another, I wish you the best of luck and continued recovery.
     
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  6. leglessmatt

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    yup, missing a couple of legs, left also missing the knee.
     
  7. LUISMARTINEZ

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    I'm gonna take a wild shot (no pun intended) and assume you are Army by your Blackhawk handle? 25th Infantry here (73-77), served 1971-79, so Hoooah!
    I understand what you said, I was a happy, working, contributing member of society from age 17 until 2013, had a stroke overnight and my life changed. Thank you for the flying tips, very helpful. It's good to know I'm not alone.
     
  8. BlackHawk388

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    Yes, U.S. Army. Somehow made it six more years after Iraq to get to retirement time as well as medically boarded. Had a lot of good friends make sure I was covered down on to get me that far. Too numerous to mention here. I was in from 1989-2009. Too many different units to list.

    Thank you for your service. From one Vet to another!
     
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  9. LUISMARTINEZ

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    Thank you too, brother. To US and those like US! There's **** too few left !!!
     
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  10. Ken Cruise

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    My son is not physically disabled but is Autistic (Non-Aspy) and he loves to fly. Like any 10 year old I do not let him have full control of the remote but I am the type of Dad\person that doesn't want to see him or anyone else hold back because of a disablility. He surprises and inspires me every day and I (a Vet myself) am inspired by all you guys for getting out there!!
     
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  11. LUISMARTINEZ

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    Glad to hear that. The sky is truly the limit!
     
    Ken Cruise likes this.