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What does the S2 switch do?

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by Brown412, Mar 29, 2014.

  1. Brown412

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    I can't find any information on the S2 switch. I just watched an oversees video and the guy could flip this switch down and then pull the right stick back and the phantom would come back home without regard to orientation. This would be handy if you are a long ways out and not sure which way your facing. So does this feature work in the US version? If so, why isn't it mentioned in the manual?
     
  2. mr_3_0_5

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    You can switch to naza mode but I suggest you understand fully how to use IOC
    In the assistant software it can be watched by clicking the on top where it says vision then change to naza
     
  3. Visioneer

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    VISION MODE & SET UP
    The P2V comes set in Vision 2 mode. There are two 3 position toggle switches on the transmitter. In this mode only the right hand switch (S1) does anything. Toggling it on-off multiple times puts the Phantom in compass calibration mode which you need to do before your first flight in a given part of the world (aka, the compass dance - involves rotating the Phantom on two different axes). Part of setting up the Phantom requires downloading two apps to a PC (Windows is covered, Apple support seems to be lagging somewhat). One of these apps is used to configure the Phantom, the other to configure the controller. Configuration is where one can switch from Vision 2 mode to NAZA mode.

    NAZA MODE - S1 SWITCH
    In NAZA mode the right hand switch (S1) allows you to select Vision 2 / GPS mode, Attitude mode, and initiate RTH or select Manual mode, the latter choice being made in configuration. Manual mode is generally reserved for those who have excellent skills or a (Phantom) death wish. Attitude mode essentially disconnects the GPS feature - the craft will roughly hold it's "attitude" based on compass and altimeter sensors, but it will drift with the wind. Initiating RTH means invoking the return home feature without having actually lost the control signal ... basically the pilot is telling the Phantom to fly itself directly home. In manual mode one is essentially flying a quadcopter with the technological assistance of several years ago, i.e., a bit of gyroscopic stabilization, but little else.

    NAZA MODE - S2 SWITCH
    In NAZA mode the left hand switch (S2) allows the pilot to choose between IOC (Intelligent Orientation Control) off, IOC home lock, and IOC course lock. With IOC off, the craft is directionally operated like any other RC craft, forward is the direction the "nose" is pointed, back is the direction the "tail" is pointed, left is to its left, right is to its right. An issue with traditional RC flight is once the craft gets far enough away (or flys into the sun) its VERY easy to lose track of how it's oriented ... is it facing toward me, or away from me? Once you lose orientation your only recourse is to give a command and see how it reacts - could mean disaster. The other issue with traditional RC flight is reversing your control. When the craft if flying away from you, all's right with the world. If you want to go to your right, you push the stick right ... BUT when the craft is coming toward you and you want to go to your right, you push the stick left because your right is now its left. This can get very confusing and dangerous, especially when you're about to crash, are in personal panic mode, and are trying to recover. Enter home and course lock. In home lock, it doesn't matter which way the craft is oriented (pointing). Back is always back to the home point (where it took off, usually where the pilot is), forward is always away from the home point, right is always 90° to the right of a line from the home point to the craft, and left is always 90° to the left of a line from the home point to the craft. Think of the craft as being on the end of a string which is the radius of a circle - shorten, it comes back; lengthen, it goes away; twirl (left or right), it goes in a circle around the home point. Similarly, in course lock, it doesn't matter which way the craft is oriented (pointing). But now forward is whatever direction the craft was pointed before it took off. It's like flying on an invisible, fixed grid. If it took off with the nose pointing north, forward will always send it north, back will always send it south, left will always send it west, and right will always send it east. Two caveats for home and course lock to work, 1) the pre-flight must've been completed (the Phantom got a home point and direction fix), and 2) the Phantom must be flying at least 10 meters (66 feet) away from the home point. Note - you can change the home point and course lock direction after takeoff while in flight, but that's info for another time (maybe check the IOC topic).

    A caution - many who "have been this way before" strongly recommend that you learn to fly well in Vision mode before going to NAZA mode. Two reasons: 1) It is extremely easy to inadvertently hit S1 or S2. If you do this in NAZA mode and don't realize you've done so, the Phantom will not be flying as you expect and panic may ensue ... bad things will then happen. 2) While these aids can be quite useful, they are a function of the complex electronics in the Phantom - if they should fail in some way, you need to have some basic skills to fall back on.

    I suspect it's not in the documentation because the Phantom 2 Vision is sold as a "simple to fly" mobile camera and they didn't want to complicate it any further in that regard. Fortunately the electronic brain they used in the P2V was their NAZA-M controller, and they did provide a means to switch to the NAZA mode. I suppose they figured anyone who was capable of using the added features would seek out the required info. Check out the DJI Wiki at http://wiki.dji.com/en/index.php/Naza-M_Setup_Wizard for more NAZA-M info (all may not apply to the P2V).
     
  4. Pull_Up

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    I did a quick video explanation about the two IOC modes using the power of Lego as a demonstration for those of us who are "visual learners"! It's in my sig below...

    Wholeheartedly agree with all the above sentiments of learning to fly in standard mode before adding any extra things to think about/play with into the mix.
     
  5. Big Ben

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    What's annoying is that DJI doesn't offer P2(V) owners adequate information about NAZA mode and IOC. There's a very useful manual (that some silly bugger decided to call Quick Start Guide) that every P2(V) owner should read but they only place it in the P1/FC40 download areas.

    http://download.dji-innovations.com/dow ... .22_en.pdf
     
  6. fizzviic

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    I fly my P1 often switching from CL to HL or GPS modes and am comfortable with it. However I have elected to leave my P2V in the "Phantom" mode for the time being.
     
  7. WeaponsHot

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    Visioneer, very helpful, the fog of war is lifting :) This really goes a long way of putting the pieces of the DJI puzzle together.

    A quick question, if I wanted the vision to turn or "pan" more slowly while taking video, what should i adjust to make the sticks less reactive? I hope I'm asking that right. Can it be done in vision mode or does it have to be in Naza-M? because sure as the day is long I'm going to screw up the switch setting while flying and I'm not going to realize it while I was in Naza mode.

    Thanks for the awesome post.
     
  8. GreyGhost

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    I was looking in the assistant software, and I clicked on the 'phantom' button in the top, and the software asked if I wanted to switch to naza mode. It gave great many dire warnings, so I didn't do it.

    Is the fear I'll have the IOC incorrectly set the only reason? Because I for one would really like to fly in homelock, and I'm pretty good about making sure my switches are correctly set.

    Does switching your phantom to naza mode do anything other then turn on IOC? (If there is a thread on this, I can't find it.)
     
  9. doug86

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    ah.... yeah... it's this thread. Visioneer did a bang up job of explaining the entire NAZA IOC thing, about 6 posts ago. Read it again.... :mrgreen:
     
  10. Visioneer

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    As doug86 said, it's in the above explanation. In addition to enabling the IOC (S2) switch, it enables the S1 switch to select from GPS mode, ATTI mode, and RTH (Return To Home) [or Manual if you set it up that way - probably a bad idea for most of us].

    The risk is inadvertently having one or the other switch in a mode you don't expect, and not just at take off ... if you're focused on flying or lining up a photo/video it's easy to hit a switch and not realize it. Then the Phantom starts acting in ways you weren't expecting and panic may set in, leading to even more trouble. Again, it is manageable, but it just seems to be something that's easily overlooked.
     
  11. Visioneer

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    Sorry I missed this post (now over a month ago).

    Some have suggested adjusting the percentage gain on the yaw in the Vision Assistant but I'm not sure that really helps (haven't tried it). I've been led to believe that the Basic gains therein have more to do with how fast the Phantom responds to its own sensors than to pilot inputs, and the Advanced gains relate to how it responds to pilot input. So the problem with this suggestion is that there is no Yaw gain adhustment in the Advanced section. See viewtopic.php?f=7&t=11446&hilit=explanation+gains for discussion of gains.

    Others have modified the transmitter (controller) to add more (variable) resistance to the resistance inherent in the yaw gimbal. They claim that works well and it makes sense to me. I may try that some day.

    See http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost ... count=2990 for mod detail. Excerpt ... I used a 10K dual ganged linear pot, installed on the front panel. This pot acts as a variable dual rate control on the Yaw channel. With this at minimum, moving the yaw stick only gives about 20% rudder. Now you can tone down the yaw and do very slow piro's as needed. I also added a bypass switch so it can be switched on and off.
     
  12. jimre

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    And of course the cheap, low-tech way to make your sticks less responsive is to put long straws over them. You can do much smaller, finer movements with a longer stick.
     
  13. doug86

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    See my recent mod post on this:
    viewtopic.php?f=27&t=14316