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Panic shutdown

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by gotfast, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. gotfast

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    On one off my flights yesterday a blast of wind hit the copter just as it touched down and put it on its side with motors going, Is a instant panic shutdown possible, I was in GPS mode, thanks.
     
  2. OI Photography

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    Just use the same stick command sequence (CSC) you used to arm the motors...both down and to the center, or whatever combo you are used to. Motors should stop immediately when you do that.
     
  3. Topeeka

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    Maybe someone can clarify this for me... I see comments advising both ways of stopping the motors upon landing. My normal procedure...and the only one I've ever used, for that matter....is to start the motors at take off using the CSC positions (both sticks pulled down and to the lower center spot....I fly.....and then when I land, I pull just the left stick further down from where it was at 'touchdown'... At that point the motors stop...and I do high-fives with the awed onlookers..!!

    So my "Actual Question" is....what, if any, is the difference between what I am doing at landing time....and the CSC maneuver that some others do and recommend..?

    I should say that I have a P2V....if there is any operational difference between the two Phantom craft.
     
  4. OI Photography

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    Topeeka, in the original Phantom (NAZA v1), those behaviors can be configured. It can be set to ignore the throttle stick going below 10% (which usually triggers shutdown after a second) while the Phantom is in the air. From what I understand that may prevent the left-stick-only shutdown from working if it doesn't realize it's on the ground yet, and the CSC shutdown should work at anytime.
     
  5. Shrimpfarmer

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    Some people report that when they shutdown by pulling both sticks together after landing that it often ends in the phantom tipping over and thus causing a blade strike.

    Holding the left stick to zero after touchdown does not cause this tip over. However the blades take about 3 seconds before they power off.

    So if everything is ok with the landing and the bird is sitting there ok, hold just the left stick down to shut down. However, if the phantom has tipped over for whatever reason your probably better off pulling both sticks together and down for an immediate shut down. After all its already tipped over so you have nothing to lose there and it might save your phantom from beating itself to death on the ground. ;)
     
  6. Topeeka

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    Thanks for the responses guys....that info makes sense to me... I think I'll just keep on keepin' on...!!
     
  7. gotfast

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    Thanks for your responses, have a merry Xmas and if flying, give way to Santa,he may have a Phantom for your neighbor.
     
  8. PhantomFan

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    What I do is reduce throttle to zero with the left stick, and hold it there until the motors stop. To do otherwise risks the Phantom toppling over, as others have said. In fact, I believe many individuals experience this flip over at landing because of their stick shut off routine.

    I am not advocating this, but on relatively windless days I hover my Phantom and/or F450 in front of me, and, wearing a neck strap on my tx, reach out with my right hand, secure the leg of the craft in a good grip, and shut down the motors with my left thumb. Easy-peasy. Do NOT do this if you are not wearing a neck strap or transmitter tray.

    On windier days, I land it on our picnic table to be safe. On REALLY windy days, I land it on the grass. I'm 60 years old and although I'm in great physical shape, I hate to bend down! :lol:

    PF
     
  9. MILLER4PRESIDENT2020

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    i land in my hand all the time without a neckstrap, looks cooler too when you have onlookers
     
  10. PhantomFan

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    I only do it when conditions are optimal. After all, the potential for injury is there no matter how careful you are. I like the support and security of the neck strap. Considering what could happen if one fumbled or dropped the transmitter while immediately adjacent to four spinning blades, I feel compelled to continue to recommend a neck strap or tx tray to those who are going to make a habit out of plucking a quadcopter out of the air.

    Not all quadcopters are as small, light weight, and trivial to secure in-hand as a Phantom. As always, you are free to do as you please commensurate with your skill level. However, when advising others who may not be as adept, procedurally safe methods are to be preferred.

    PF
     
  11. Pull_Up

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    I actually tend to do the reverse. On calmer days I land on the ground, on windier or turbulent days I hand catch as air turbulence coupled with ground effect can make things quite squirrelly close to the ground.

    When hand catching I always have my back to the wind and fly the aircraft up wind towards me. That way any sudden gusts will move it away from me. I also always have it above head height and reach up, taking a good grip of one landing skid upright. If in doubt let go and reposition for another run.

    However and whenever you do it, safety first.
     
  12. PhantomFan

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    Makes sense...although when it's gusty I'd rather land 10 feet away and break a prop rather than risk a deep cut to finger or face. Just my personal preference, but I see your point.

    No matter how breezy, so long as there is sufficient battery power available, I just hover at 2 - 3 feet and wait for a moment's calm OR land in the wind shadow of some structure, like my shed.

    PF