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Ideal Settings for Outdoor Filming GoPro Hero3+ Silver

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Fink, May 23, 2014.

  1. Fink

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    Hey guys,

    I did some searching but it kept dropping the majority of my search terms.

    I have a Hero3+ Silver Edition and it seems as though it just doesn't handle bright environments very well, which is unfortunate for me, being in Florida. What have you guys found to be the ideal settings/filters for the Hero3+ Silver Editions in bright settings? I am kind of regretting not getting the Black Edition now, given that you can adjust the white balance and such with it.

    I do have the full Adobe suite, so I could potentially use After Effects to help, but I haven't quite mastered all of that just yet.

    Thanks!

    Fink[​IMG]
     
  2. happydogs

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    i'll reply and hopefully save you some work...I'm new, too, but am quickly ramping up. google the heck out of your equipment...hero 3+ silver...and not just uav sites...read read read...and then go test. but, from my take, using 60 or 30 or 24 is a biggie...many people say use 60 and then export to 30...or even 24 but 24 doesn't go into 60 (or 30) an even number of times so it may "jerk" because of when and where frames are dropped.

    1080p or 2.7? again, read read read. and then go test.

    if you more experienced digital camera people have corrections or additions to my words, please weigh in...I ain't no insecure crybaby!
     
  3. Fink

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    Thanks for the reply!

    I typically shoot in 1080 W 60fps and just leave it as that. Would adjusting the frame rate effect the washout I get from the sun? I hadn't thought about that since I figured the more frames per second the better...but I guess that's not always true.

    Thanks again!

    Fink[​IMG]
     
  4. happydogs

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    "washout from the sun"...hmmm? not sure I'm qualified but here goes...the higher frame rate lets less light in on each frame...so bright light conditions prompt the use of 60 fps. then again, you can make the white balance adjustment.
    then again, again!, all photographers everywhere with anything have trouble with shooting into the sun. also, if you haven't experienced this yet you might, facing into the sun may result in blade shadow on your image...google the heck out of that puppy.
     
  5. ladykate

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    I'm not a movie maker but I know movie makers. Shooting a 60 and slowing to 24 makes a wonderful pan effect. You don't drop frames (all frames are shown - the run time is longer). It isn't as good for people or some moving objects but I've seen the edits to an independent film coming out this year and they used a silver on a P1 (this was early last year - no P2 available) and got some great footage.

    I've not had a problem with over exposure in bright sun - although you get the sky washed out. You can use a polarization filter for darkening the sky. If you just want to darken the whole thing then use an ND filter - using an ND filter also can help with some types of jello and prop flutter that you see in bright light.
     
  6. Diesel31

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    I think you need to have multiple settings depending on what you capture. If it's a sunny day or middle of the day, I use an ND filter. FPS is set higher @ 60. Most likely 1080p medium, but have been spending more time with 2.7 which look really nice. Low light situations I drop the FPS to 24/30/48 depending on 2.7 or 1080. I rarely use superwide of wide formats just because I don't like the distortion and don't want to spend time taking it out in post.

    I also use Protune sometimes, but I don't think I edit it well enough to look good. I can get decent colors, but I just can attain the same sharpness, which is why I do a lot of non-Protune.

    I might mix formats, but I render all my videos in 1080p.
     
  7. dcoski

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  8. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    An ND filter is essential for bright outdoor shots (and it needs to be balanced). For your washout, you probably want to fashion some sort of visor to keep sunlight from directly hitting the lens. I haven't added a visor yet but need to do so.
     
  9. CarlJ

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    I have a 3+ Silver and 1080 W 60fps is perfect for shooting outdoors, you can't film in 2.7k so just ignore that. As someone else already said you use a lower frame rate for lower light situations. The idea being the lower frame rate allows for more light to enter the camera.

    The advice to get a filter is sound, it'll improve the washed out look you're getting. One draw back to our camera is the auto white balance...it's a real *****. I've ordered some filters for mine, but I think rebalancing my gimbal is going to be an issue. I also have a handheld gimbal, so double the fun.

    Good luck with your video!
     
  10. Fink

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    Thank you for all the replies, guys! Huge help!

    Sounds like I've been shooting it in the right mode, maybe needing to drop to "Medium" versus "Wide".

    I actually do have an ND filter sitting on my workbench. Hadn't thought about having to rebalance the gimbal, though. No clue how to do that and may not want to mess with it. I need to start planning my flights/shoots for the right time of day. Challenge is the weather here in Florida. We're already into the 90+ degree days with 100+ heat index. It's a real *****.

    I may throw on the ND filter and just see what happens. Worst-case, I could go back to my fixed camera mount if I need to until I can balance the gimbal.

    Thanks again for all of the advice! I really appreciate it.

    Fink[​IMG]
     
  11. CarlJ

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    They wouldn't include the medium setting if it weren't advantageous to use in some situations. I wish I could offer more help with balancing your filter, but I just haven't gotten into that yet. I always say the best shots are contrived, so planning the best time to shoot is a good idea.

    I'll try to keep you updated with the balancing of my filter. Which gimbal do you own, if you don't mind me asking?
     
  12. TexasHighDef

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    I used Velcro and 4 US quarters to balance out my gimbal. I have a 3D with ND and I glued two quarters together then put Velcro on them and on the back of the 3D. I put them very low and as far to the side as I could. Then I took another set of quarters and Velcroed them to the outside of the pivot point to the far left looking at the front of it. It balances it right out. It now floats like when it is power up at all times. My setup adds 21 grams of weight.(the 4 quarters) But takes the weight off of the gimbal's motors and if I don't want to use the ND I just pull them off. Sure the ND and quarters most likely cut 2to3mins off flight times.
    But it is well worth it to me.