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How much can I Quote for my Service

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by cjaviert, Dec 4, 2014.

  1. cjaviert

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    Hello, I got a question, here in my country EL Salvador is legal to give aerial video and Photo service using drones, I got a company called me and ask me how much do I charge them to take some pictures and video using my DJI Phantom with gopro 3 Black Edition, for 2 hours.

    I know in some countries its ilegal but maybe some one has done this before and I would like some advice on how much can I charge them. Im using a DJI Phantom, with tarot gimbal and FPV.


    Please any information will be wellcome.
     
  2. Hughie

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    I suggest you understand what your local laws say.
    In the UK a commercial license is needed, otherwise selling aerial footage is outlawed.

    I understand those who make money from such things in the UK use a neat loophole,in that the video is given free, but a charge is made for the editing service.
     
  3. cjaviert

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    In El Salvador where I live Its not ilegal to film or take aerial pictures, and all they want its the video and Photos without edition, they will do it. They want to film monuments and tourism places. I guess I need to charge for Timeframes (Hours) but I don't have any parameter of How much to charge.
     
  4. Happyflyer

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    There is a very large difference in the amount people charge. From very low to the professional people that must charge very high because of very expensive equipement. Maybe look around for someone in your country that does this. Very hard to suggest an amount.
     
  5. hotstink626

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    I tell you a story a few years ago i was having a business lunch with this guy . In the middle of lunch he picks up this plate and says to me "what do you think this plate is worth ?" Now this was just a normal restaurant white plate maybe worth about $10 at the most.
    So he calls out to waiter and say "pass me your marker" which he did then he signed it.. and said "what do you think its worth now ?"
    Well more than $10 now considering this guy was Gene Simons from the band Kiss . And Gene says to me exactly "what ever someone is prepared to pay for it" so the moral of my story is you can be a $10 plate or you can be that autographed plate its your choice on what type of business you want to be. And how much to charge.
     
  6. Hughie

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    I think dirkclod makes a good point.

    If you are not yet established in any business, it makes sense to keep your price low to start with.

    That way you will get work, you will get more experience, you will get recommendations for more work.

    If you pitch it right and you are lucky and you are doing a reasonable job which delivers good value to customers, you will reach a point where you have more business than you can handle.

    That is the point when you slowly start raising your prices.
     
  7. Meta4

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    Although it is often mentioned on forums, this is wrong.
    You would only be fooling yourself.
    The authorities are not that dumb and will have no trouble seeing through this.
     
  8. Hughie

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    I think that would come down to existing case law. Is there any ?
     
  9. SteveMann

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    I completely disagree. You charge the client what it's worth to him. Not to you.
    People who charge less because they are just starting a business never seem to be able to get out of the bargain basement even years later.

    To the OP:
    In the US, a professional photographer would likely get between $100 to $200 per hour for photos from the ground. I wouldn't take less for photos from a drone. (I.E., prices can only go up, LOL).
     
  10. Hughie

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    It seems we have different experiences. I am not limiting my point to photography or to one business venture either. I agree that you should charge as much as you can but if you charge more than it is worth to the prospect you wont get the work. It's all about evolution.
     
  11. steveeds

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    Your customer will have an idea based on markets currently available, for instance getting house photos for a sale or a family portrait, find out all the services provided where the camera is used and pick the highest price then add perhaps 15% to that price. Perhaps you are exclusive if so add another 15% to that, Look at the whole job with the time needed/editing etc.

    It is very hard to charge, it's a fact but it is a practised and learnt thing, personally I learnt too late to charge what I needed to survive (most do) so do attempt to force your prices to the limit, your customer doesn't know you and if he complains challenge his ill informed expectations of price with gentle reasoning, practise what conversations may come up and cover all basses.

    As pointed out it is hard to "come back" from a cheap price so don't sell yourself short from the start.
    Make sure you do produce a top quality product with a top quality service and make it all about your customer
    Take hundreds of shots and hopefully you may with luck get a few of those perfect shots.

    Best wishes, the braver you are now the better the results.
     
  12. PhantomFanatic

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    A long time ago when I went through a nine day SCUBA instructor course, one lecture was on how much to charge for your services. Some diving stores discount their course fee, to get more students. This can imply that 'our' courses aren't of value. The lesson was to charge what you feel your services are worth. If a 2 week SCUBA course is only worth $99, then it isn't a course that I would take.

    This approach is for services, not for selling merchandise. But, even then, it can come in play. In companies where numerous merchants sell, they are usually rated by the customers. I've had products that I just could not match the competition's price, yet I sold a lot of that product.

    The reason? I had a 100% customer service rating and the competition had a 95% rating. Both are good ratings, but they went with a company that had more worth. I've done the same thing myself. Would I use an aerial photography service that charges $10 an hour or $50 an hour? I would go with the latter as I would imagine that the $10 service cuts corners, to charge such a low price.