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Canada removes commercial drone restrictions

Discussion in 'News' started by rbhamilton, Nov 5, 2014.

  1. rbhamilton

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    It was always legal to use a light drone for hobby purposes but when you went commercial - like say shooting some real estate footage - you needed to file a bunch of paperwork and wait 3 weeks. Well no more. Canada is removing the red tape!

    http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/techandsc ... ar-BBddrFl
     
  2. cruz_ctrl

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    This is good news. Here's the article:
    ==================================4
    Ottawa is loosening restrictions on flying unmanned aerial systems.

    Currently, anyone who operates a drone that weighs two kilograms or more for non-recreational purposes must obtain a permit called a Special Flight Operations Certificate from Transport Canada.

    Martin Eley, director general of civil aviation for Transport Canada, said at the 12th annual Unmanned Systems Canada conference Wednesday that the requirement will be changed later this month, likely on Nov. 27.

    Under new exemptions, the certificate will not be required for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) under two kilograms and “certain operations involving UAVs under 25 kilograms,” according to a Transport Canada press release. Operators of UAVs over 25 kg must still apply for the certificate.

    “The new approach will apply to commercial operations and contribute to a strong safety regime for those on the ground and in the skies,” the announcement said.

    “Once the changes come into effect later this month, operators must check on Transport Canada’s website if the exemptions apply to them and respect specific safety conditions, including requirements to operate within visual line-of-sight, maximum altitudes and away from built-up areas and aerodromes.”

    Transport Canada says it also simplifying the application process and reducing the time it takes to issue the certificates for larger UAV operators.

    Last month, Transport Minister Lisa Raitt launched a safety awareness campaign for UAVs.

    Drones — a word the industry and Eley dislike for its instant identification with military aircraft that have assassinated terrorists — have become wildly popular for civil use in recent years.

    They run the gamut from a consumer toy that weighs less than a pound to large Predator unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that circle at 60,000 feet and are used for surveillance and reconnaissance — and for targeting enemies.

    The regulator will introduce new rules and norms for drones in an attempt to strike the right balance between safety and the growing use of the unmanned — but not unpiloted — machines, Eley said.

    Stewart Baillie, a former National Research Council flight operations director who now heads the Unmanned Systems trade association, said that the remote-controlled aircraft are becoming an essential tool for a wide array of applications.

    “In agriculture, for instance,” said Baillie. “You can now pinpoint which part of the field needs (fertilizer), and you can even see how far apart you should plant the seeds.”

    Eley said that in 2010, his department issued 66 SFOCs. The figure last year was 949. Many consumers buy machines from China or an electronic store and fly them for recreational purposes, which require no permit, he said.
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  3. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    Well played Canada! I don't know what your rules are for urban commercial use but you're still several steps ahead. I predict a bunch of Phantom weight loss threads to keep under the 2kg limit. Meanwhile due south, we're still waiting for something more logical than "Your Phantom is a Phantom until someone gives you a dollar at which point it's a Cessna."
     
  4. WPSPETE

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    Made my day! Still sounds like we will need to fill out an SFOC for some things. But this should make it easier.
     
  5. gordhunt

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    Awesome !
     
  6. ilovecoffee

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    http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=900449


    Simpler rules for small unmanned air vehicles
    Transport Canada makes it easier to fly small UAVs for work and pleasure
    November 5, 2014, 2014 – Montréal, Quebec – Transport Canada

    Transport Canada today announced, at the Unmanned Systems Canada conference in Montréal, two exemptions that simplify small unmanned air vehicle (UAV) operations and safely integrate UAVs into Canadian airspace.

    Under the new exemptions, a Special Flight Operations Certificate will not be required for UAVs under 2 kilograms and certain operations involving UAVs under 25 kilograms. The new approach will apply to commercial operations and contribute to a strong safety regime for those on the ground and in the skies.

    Once the changes come into effect later this month, operators must check on Transport Canada’s website if the exemptions apply to them and respect specific safety conditions, including requirements to operate within visual line-of-sight, maximum altitudes and away from built-up areas and aerodromes. In addition, Transport Canada is simplifying the application process and reducing the time it takes to issue Special Flight Operations Certificates for larger UAV operators.

    In October, Minister Raitt launched the Government of Canada’s national safety awareness campaign for UAVs, which aims to help Canadians better understand the risks and responsibilities of flying UAVs. For more information, please visit http://www.tc.gc.ca/SafetyFirst.

    Quick Facts
    Transport Canada regulates the use of all aircraft, manned and unmanned, to keep the public and our airspace safe.

    Canada has had safety regulations in place that govern the use of UAVs since 1996.

    Operators must still apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate for UAVs weighing more than 25 kg.

    If a UAV is operated without a Special Flight Operations Certificate and should be, Transport Canada can issue fines of up to $5,000 for an individual and $25,000 for a company.

    If an operator does not follow the requirements of their Special Flight Operations Certificate, Transport Canada can issue fines of up to $3,000 for an individual and $15,000 for a business.

    Quotes
     
  7. damoncooper

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  8. macheung

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    How do you make a phantom that can fly while weighting over 2kg?
     
  9. ilovecoffee

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    The pv2+ is only 1.2kg
     
  10. Khudson7

    Khudson7 Guest

    ROFWL :D