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terrorist mosquito in my office

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by JKDSensei, Sep 23, 2015.

  1. JKDSensei

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    Arrrggghh!

    Got this mosquito in my office that does a "hit and run" (or bit and ran) on me for a week now.

    I've tried to find it but the darn thing hides in between attacks. Every once in a while I'll see it whiz by and try my best to get it but so far no good. Searched high and low but it hides.

    Then I'll be working on the computer and start itching like crazy where it bit me AGAIIN!

    I may have to set off one of those room bombs to be rid of this mosquito from hell.

    Driving me NUTS!
     
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  2. snerd

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    They're attracted to Phantoms. Mine is always covered in blood from them. Just make a few lazy loops of the office with your "bird". Problem solved. :cool:
     
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  3. JKDSensei

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    lol

    Right now she's in hiding. Fat and happy on MY blood. Grrrrrr.
     
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  4. JKDSensei

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    Hey Robsquad, sounds like you "Been there Done that too" lol
     
  5. Fplvert

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    Here's my fly/mosquito killer. Also works on sneaky spiders.;) image.jpg
     
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  6. JKDSensei

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    FPLvert,
    This ones too sneaky. Never seen anything like it. I never see her. She waits and waits and waits, then when I least expect it I just start itching. Usually waits till I doze off or let my guard down. **** thing's' been in here for almost a week! Thought it'd die by now or something.
     
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  7. IflyinWY

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    Where the deer and the antelope play
    If you can get ahold of a "Dryer Sheet", the kind that makes things smell perfumie and gets rid of wrinkles and static cling, you can keep it close by, or laying over a shoulder.

    Sounds nutty but it works. I fold one over the back of my collar sometimes, when the little buggers are making me crazie. ;)
     
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  8. JKDSensei

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    The siege is FINALLY over !

    She came out for feeding and made the huge mistake of flying in front of my computer monitor.

    SQUISH !!!!

    Peace at last.
     
    Fplvert likes this.
  9. Man.Of.Kent

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    Just hope that her grieving children don't know where you live!
     
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  10. RedHotPoker

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    I thought it might be . . .
    Insect Spy Drone~FAA, sent to check up on you. ;-)

    Is this a mosquito?
    No. It's an insect spy drone for urban areas, already in production, funded by the US Government. It can be remotely controlled and is equipped with a camera and a microphone. It can land on you, and it may have the potential to take a DNA sample or leave RFID tracking nanotechnology on your skin. It can fly through an open window, or it can attach to your clothing until you take it in your home.
    image: http://www.snopes.com/photos/technology/graphics/drone.jpg

    [​IMG]
    Origins: One of the current areas of research reportedly being undertaken in the scientific/military field is the development of micro air vehicles (MAVs), tiny flying objects intended to go places that cannot be (safely) reached by humans or other types of equipment. One of the primary military applications envisioned for MAVs is the gathering of intelligence (through the surreptitious use of cameras, microphones, or other types of sensors); among the more extreme applications posited for such devices is that they may eventually be used as "swarm weapons" which could be launched en masse against enemy forces.

    Some efforts in MAV research have involved trying to mimic birds or flying insects to achieve flight capabilities not attainable through other means of aerial propulsion. In 2007 a bug-like MAV model with a 3-cm wingspan was displayed at a robotics conference, in 2008 the U.S. Air Force released a simulated video showing MAVs about the size of bumblebees, and in 2012 engineers at Johns Hopkins University were studying the flight of butterflies to "help small airborne robots mimic these maneuvers."

    The specific mosquito-like object pictured above is, however, just a conceptualmock-up of a design for a MAV, not a photograph of an actual working device "already in production." And although taking DNA samples or inserting micro-RFID tracking devices under the skin of people are MAV applications that may some day be possible, such possibilities currently appear to be speculative fiction rather than reality.

    Some have claimed the U.S. government has not only researched and developed insect-like MAVs, but for several years has been furtively employing them for domestic surveillance purposes:
    The US government has been accused of secretly developing robotic insect spies amid reports of bizarre flying objects hovering in the air above anti-war protests.

    No government agency has admitted to developing insect-size spy drones but various official and private organisations have admitted that they are trying.

    But official protestations of innocence have failed to kill speculation of government involvement after a handful of sightings of the objects at political events in New York and Washington.

    Vanessa Alarcon, a university student who was working at an anti-war rally in the American capital [in September 2007], told the Washington Post: "I heard someone say, 'Oh my God, look at those.'

    "I look up and I'm like, 'What the hell is that?'. They looked like dragonflies or little helicopters. But I mean, those are not insects."

    Bernard Crane, a lawyer who was at the same event, said he had "never seen anything like it in my life". He added: "They were large for dragonflies. I thought, 'Is that mechanical or is that alive?'"

    The incident has similarities with an alleged sighting at the 2004 Republican National Convention in New York when one peace march participant described on the internet seeing "a jet-black dragonfly hovering about 10 feet off the ground, precisely in the middle of 7th Avenue".

    Entomologists suggest that the objects are indeed dragonflies. Jerry Louton, an expert at the National Museum of Natural History, said Washington was home to large, impressively-decorated dragonflies that "can knock your socks off".
    The technical challenges of creating robotic insects are daunting, and most experts doubt that fully working models exist yet. "If you find something, let me know," said Gary Anderson of the Defense Department's Rapid Reaction Technology Office.
    Getting from bird size to insect size is not a simple matter of making everything smaller.
    "You can't make a conventional robot of metal and ball bearings and just shrink the design down," said Ronald Fearing, a roboticist at the University of California at Berkeley. For one thing, the rules of aerodynamics change at very tiny scales and require wings that flap in precise ways — a huge engineering challenge. Scientists have only recently come to understand how insects fly. Other maintain the technical obstacles involved in creating flying insect sized robots have yet yo be overcome.
    Even if the technical hurdles are overcome, insect-size fliers will always be risky investments. "They can get eaten by a bird, they can get caught in a spider web," Professor Fearing said.

    RedHotPoker
     
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