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  1. Gollum1973

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    Just woundering if anyone has taken their p4 on a plane on a domestic flight in Australia? I am aware it will come down to the fact they have lithium batteries. Has anyone done this from Western Australia. Or do i have to speak with the airport direct?
    Thanks in advance.

    Sent from my SM-T815Y using PhantomPilots mobile app
     
  2. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
    Staff Member

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    People fly with Phantoms every day of the week and airport security staff are unlikely to even blink when they see its distinctive shape in the X-ray scanner.
    Batteries are the issue and must be in carry-on luggage.
    Go to your airline's website and search for batteries or lithium to see their restrictions.

    If you are going Qantas or Virgin, I've done that already for you:
    Dangerous Goods | Qantas
    or ... down the page in Battery Powered Equipment here:
    Dangerous goods information | Virgin Australia
     
  3. John Locke

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    One caution about flying with your Phantom, if you fly on a smaller regional jet, the kind that have two seats per side, some of them don't have enough overhead room for the standard carry-on of 22X14X9', which is the approximate size of many Phantom backpacks. Also, prop planes, often used in rural areas, they don't have adequate overhead space either. They will typically collect those 22X14X9 carry-on bags right before you board the plane on the tarmac and put them in the belly of the plane. When you land, you usually pick them up on the tarmac too, so the handling isn't as much as going through baggage claim.

    It's those times you need to be prepared to pull the batteries out of the backpack quickly, putting them in a smaller bag as a very small carry-on that fits in the smaller overhead, or under the seat. Hopefully your drone won't get damaged with this "jetway/tarmac bag collection" process. It's those scenarios where the hard shell backpack that DJI sells (and others) that might be worth using. I personally don't like those due to the limited storage room inside, but the hard shell protection, while being light and backpackable is a good way to go if you fly those types of planes all the time. Check your flight reservation carefully, study the plane type, be prepared.
     
    #3 John Locke, Aug 10, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2016
    CThruU likes this.
  4. Gollum1973

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    Thanks John.

    I will be flying qantas 737. And accourding to the airport website. It's anything upto 160wh. The p4 batteries are only 81.3Wh. I will be flying business so i should be ok for storage above me.

    Thanks again

    Sent from my SM-T815Y using PhantomPilots mobile app
     
  5. Stephanelacasaphoto

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    Location:
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    Drain the batteries before flight, tell the flight attendants you have Lithium batteries with you with a big smile.
    print FAA(USA) or Civil Aviation Safety Authority rules take it with you.
    Hope it help
    Aloha
     
    MichaelS likes this.
  6. John Locke

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    Yes, generally speaking, with batteries under 100wh you can carry-on an unlimited number of batteries that are individually protected from shorts. Above 100wh you are allowed just 2 batteries to carry on (Inspire TB48 fit this category, 129wh). These are FAA guidelines in the US, I'm sure rules in Australia may be different, with each airline.