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Overexposed on water

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Xsurfer, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Xsurfer

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    hi

    been flying with camera tilt all the way down and phantom at least 100 ft or more
    For filming Paddleboarder ( White board)
    and wakesurfing with boat(white)

    Each time image of water is A1 and correctly exposed, but since it was sunny days , or the board of the paddleboarder or the boat of wakesurfer is overexpossed....

    What is the best way to correct this situation??
     
  2. Darwish

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    Nd filter, it will Get you a much better shutter speed, (should be at the double of the frame rate) And it makes a balanced exposure. I recommend 3 Pack from PolarPro.


    Sent from my iPhone using PhantomPilots
     
  3. WetDog

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    Nop
    That isn't going to help much. It will slow you shutter speed down a bit but it won't deal with the high degree of contrast between the white board and the dark water. You can do three things. First, just wait a second. The autoexposure function in the camera is actually pretty good but it takes several seconds to figure out what is going on. Once it has a good exposure then you work on not changing the view much so you don't confuse the meter. That may or may not work depending on exactly what you are taking videos of.

    Second, use the spot meter. Place it on the white part. That will set the exposure for the white board, the water will likely be a bit dark but it's water.

    Third and the best approach, use a manual exposure. Turn on the Zebra function (called 'highlight' somethingorother) where the camera shows over exposed areas with a hatched black line. Adjust the shutter speed and ISO to where you just see a tiny little bit of zebra skin. The disadvantage to this approach is that again, if you move the camera to where the scene changes markedly, you will likely be exposed wrong.

    The key to good video is planning ahead. You can't expect anything short of a $20000 camera to deal with a bright white board and a dark blue ocean without some compromises. But you can fake it pretty easily. You just have to pick your shots and adjust the exposure as needed. And delete the bad parts in post.

    I often use a combo of autoexposure and spot metering since the scene is changing too rapidly for me to want to mess with exposure all of the time. Just be patient and let the camera settle and chop out the ugly bits.
     
    alokbhargava likes this.
  4. alokbhargava

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    Try a polarized lens, that may help you too.


    Sent from my iPhone using PhantomPilots
     
  5. Xsurfer

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    Ok thanks guys!