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National Association of REALTORS just Tweeted this...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Dizzy Lizzard, Apr 17, 2014.

  1. Dizzy Lizzard

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    The National Association of REALTORS, America's largest trade association for Realtors just tweeted this to all 126,000 of its follows


    REALTORS® (@REALTORS)
    4/17/14 10:50 AM
    Why you shouldn't use drones for your real estate business yet -- the straight scoop (and busted myths) from the FAA: 1.usa.gov/1eO7O2J


    Here is the link incase it doesn't work above....
    http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=76381&sf2590425=1
     
  2. AerialJerseyDevil

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    Ouch, my aunt is a realtor and I've been begging to do some editin work for her. Boss is hesitant and this doesn't help. :(
     
  3. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    The only fact about that FAA page is that it's all a myth.
     
  4. derrickduff

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  5. Suwaneeguy

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    All of the myths on that page were generated and created by the FAA.
    As a scare tactic to try and keep drone pilots in check.
    You are probably not aware that the NTSB recently ruled that the FAA NEVER had jurisdiction on any UAV.
    And they ruled the FAA could not cite pilots of UAV's on a law which did not exist.

    To my knowledge, the FAA has never attempted to enforce any alleged illegal use of a UAV for any purpose until recently.
    When they learned this new fangled thing could be equipped with a camera, and used for commecical purposes, this is when they decided to step in and try to control the hobby.

    While the law may define what an aircraft is, other laws also exempt UAV's from prosecution.
     
  6. SilentAV8R

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    Be that as it may (and I agree with you) count on the FAA making a pain out of themselves. They can threaten, harass, intimidate and cause you all kinds of grief which can cost you time AND money. Also, I am nearly 100% certain that the FAA is making a list and checking it twice so once their rules are in place and they do in fact have legal authority over commercial flying that they will hit the ground running.

    Just remember the old song: "I fought the law and the law won"
     
  7. derrickduff

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    How many UAV owners does the FAA have the resources to do something about? Out of all the hype and fear mongering they've taken ONE person to court, and lost.

    Now think about the resources of all the business that will profit from the use of UAVs. I'd say it's stacked rather heavily against the FAA. When money fights the law money will win 9 times out of 10.
     
  8. SilentAV8R

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    I think once they have actual rules in place that they will initially have a pretty strong enforcement push. I think this because they know it is the WIld West right now and they will want to show everyone that there is a new sheriff in town.
     
  9. derrickduff

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    You're underestimating the lobby power of the industries pushing for clear rules and regulations on commercial UAV use. The FAA can try all they want to create draconian laws against commercial use. But if these laws don't sit well with the industries banking on profits with UAV use they won't ever be written. We're talking about Real Estate, Agriculture, and Oil. All billion dollar industries wanting to use UAVs commercially. Just the sales of Drones alone is a billion dollar industry. I just read somewhere an estimated 80 billion over the next 10 years. That kind of money has a lot of power in the good old U-S of A.
     
  10. SilentAV8R

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    I see a fairly common theme here, that being that the FAA is either not going to be able to enforce their rules (once put into effect) or that the industry will be so powerful that they will not be able to do what they plan on doing. I disagree with both ideas. FAA has proven to be very effective against the commercial airline industry and I do not think they will be shy with the UAV industry. Beyond that, the people they will listen to at least to some extent will be the big players like Boeing, General Atomics, Northrup-Gruman, etc. The Mom and Pop Shop AP folks are the ones who will have the least clout.
     
  11. Ronan87

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    Expect proper laws to be put in place to filter & tax commercial drone pilots (or w/e they are called).

    That's about it, maybe some guidance to make sure average joe doesn't do something too stupid with his $500 toy drone.

    Multi-billions dollars companies are already looking into purchasing drones for security, inspection and field mapping (also progress mapping). Think they will sit still and let something like the FAA bother them? No.
     
  12. SilentAV8R

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    I know a couple of people who work for the big "drone" companies. Most of them are way ahead of the FAA and require their pilots to pass the FAA Private Pilot ground exam and to hold a 3rd class medical certificate. They also have recurrent training and certification within the company. SO they are not worried about the FAA.
     
  13. Jermz

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    And here's the rebuttle.

    Myth 1: recent court decision establishes exactly the opposite.
    Myth 2: once again, look at court decision.
    Myth 3: irrelevant, they don't control model aircraft
    Myth 4: see myth number 1
    Myth 5: irrelevant, they can't go after you because they can't go after you
    Myth 6: if anything the opposite is true, FAA and congress may have toyed act together by then
    Myth 7: ha! That was funny
    Myth 8: what foes this have to do with anything? Prices of quads/uav's/drones have dropped and the original estimates were off

    This whole page us a load of bull



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. AerialJerseyDevil

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    ****! That's awesome and an awesome site you have. Good to see someone doing great.
     
  15. MILLER4PRESIDENT2020

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    What are some of these companies?
    I have a first class medical, an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate, 6000 flight hours and 300 drone hours.
    I would love to get paid to fly a quad around (providing I am using it for peaceful purposes)
     
  16. SilentAV8R

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    You should contact companies like Aerovironment, General Atomics, and any number of other manufacturers of sUAS. Fixed wing RC aircraft experience is often a plus with some of these companies.
     
  17. Visioneer

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    It's absolutely true that the FAA doesn't presently control model aircraft ... but they might be able to in the future, at least indirectly. Here's the complete text of section 336 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, PUBLIC LAW 112–95 (Help yourself at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-112pu ... publ95.pdf - it's only 145 pages!)

    SEC. 336. SPECIAL RULE FOR MODEL AIRCRAFT.

    (a) IN GENERAL.— Notwithstanding any other provision of law relating to the incorporation of unmanned aircraft systems into Federal Aviation Administration plans and policies, including this subtitle, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration may not promulgate any rule or regulation regarding a model aircraft, or an aircraft being developed as a model aircraft, if —

    (1) the aircraft is flown strictly for hobby or recreational use;

    (2) the aircraft is operated in accordance with a community based set of safety guidelines and within the programming of a nationwide community-based organization;

    (3) the aircraft is limited to not more than 55 pounds unless otherwise certified through a design, construction, inspection, flight test, and operational safety program administered by a community-based organization;

    (4) the aircraft is operated in a manner that does not interfere with and gives way to any manned aircraft; and

    (5) when flown within 5 miles of an airport, the operator of the aircraft provides the airport operator and the airport air traffic control tower (when an air traffic facility is located at the airport) with prior notice of the operation (model aircraft operators flying from a permanent location within 5 miles or an airport should establish a mutually-agreed upon operating procedure with the airport operator and the airport air traffic control tower (when an air traffic facility is located at the airport)).

    (b) STATUTORY CONSTRUCTION.— Nothing in this section shall be construed to limit the authority of the Administrator to pursue enforcement action against persons operating model aircraft who endanger the safety of the national airspace system.

    (c) MODEL AIRCRAFT DEFINED.— In this section, the term "model aircraft" means an unmanned aircraft that is —

    (1) capable of sustained flight in the atmosphere;

    (2) flown within visual line of sight of the person operating the aircraft; and

    (3) flown for hobby or recreational purposes.


    Section (a) is routinely quoted as why the FAA can't touch model aircraft. Unfortunately, parts (1) through (5) don't often get mentioned but they are the big IF, i.e., section (a) applies IF parts (1) through (5) are satisfied. Regards part (2), it's not spelled out what "a community based set of safety guidelines and within the programming of a nationwide community-based organization" means. The only identifiable organization that appears to presently fit this description is the AMA (note, it says a pilot has to follow a qualifying organization's guidelines, it doesn't say a pilot has to belong to the organization).

    Section (b) might give the FAA a loophole because what actions "endanger the safety of the national airspace" are not defined.

    And section (c) might present a problem because it requires that an aircraft be flown "within visual line of sight" to qualify under the law as a "model aircraft", and hence to qualify for protection from FAA regulation.

    Things to keep in mind ...
    * FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 is already law.
    * The FAA has not yet gone through their rule making process to create any regulations under this law which may be impacted by section 336. As the NTSB administrative law judge ruled, there are no enforceable FAA regulations regards model aircraft today. And, per this law, there can be none provided the craft meets this law's definition of model aircraft and is flown per its restrictions (the "if" parts).
    * While the wording in this section does not appear all that complicated (i.e., not a lot of "legalese"), as with all laws, the courts will ultimately decide what it means ... and they have been known to come up with some creative interpretations.

    By this post I'm not promoting any position over any other ... just thought it useful that we are fully cognizant of the relative law that could conceivably be used either for or against us.
     
  18. SilentAV8R

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    AMA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the FAA in January 2014. This is the first step towards the FAA recognizing the AMA as a COmmunity Based Organization (CBO).

    I agree with most of the above post, and especially that Section 336 only applies if you meet all the criteria set forth. FOr those willing to meet those criteria very little will change.

    I strongly suspect that the FAA WILL have some rules pertaining to model aircraft that will apply to those who choose NOT to comply with the CBO standards. I also suspect those will be more restrictive.

    In any case, I am almost 100% certain that the FAA will restrict ALL sUAS except under some very stringet rules to being VLOS only and below 400 AGL.

    So for all those that are having great fun seeing how far away and how high you can fly, I'd have my fun while you can, because I'll be shocked if the FAA allows that to continue.

    And for those that thing the DJI airport restrictions are oppressive, I think the FAA is going to make you very unhappy. Some things I think will happen:

    1 - no operations in Class B airspace except by model aircraft at established flying sites.
    2 - no BLOS operations except under something like a COA and with higher operational standards and aircraft certification
    3 - no flying within a certain radius of other airports without coordination with the ATC or airport management there.
    4 - commercial operators will be required to maintain records, have at least a 3rd class medical, and have passed the Private Pilot ground school test.

    Bottom line - things are going to change and I think very few people are going to be happy about it with the exception of model aircraft hobbyists. Even they will have things they do not like!