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lost my drone, found it, battery depleted what now?

Discussion in 'Phantom FC40 Discussion' started by mckenzp86, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. mckenzp86

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    i have a phantom fc40 and i lost it for a couple of hours yesterday, luckily it landed on the field by my friends mums house and i got it back but the battery was not disconected and it has been depleted. tried charging but it was like charger did not have anything connected, tried again this morning and charge status is flashing red an 1s is flashing red jumping backwards and forwards never flashing at same time. does anyone know what this means? is my broke? Thanks for any help
     
  2. QYV

    QYV

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    Have you inspected the battery for any physical damage? is it swelling at all or cracked or in any way imperfect? If so you should def go with a new battery.

    On the other hand it could be cables or contacts inside the Phantom that got broken or knocked loose have you opened it and carefully inspected all that stuff?
     
  3. J.James

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    i the battery was completely drained it may have a very hard time charging and even if it does its going to take a long long long time. it could take all day. But if the ballance leds are blinking it may be trying to charge. and even still it may have lost some life and if you can charge it watch your flight time to be sure you dont run out of power early.
     
  4. lake_flyer

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    The DJI charger is very picky. I had the same problem when I tried out lower voltage alarm settings. Batteries didn't charge normally but the charger kept on blinking 1 red led at 2s. Kept on blinking all day. Luckily I found a lipo charger from a long gone Lama laying around and that charges no matter how empty they are.

    Another trick I read somewhere is to take a fresh 9Volt battery and connect the poles with the lipo for a few minutes. If you're lucky it's just enough to jumpstart the charging sequence again. But I never tried it myself and I'm not sure if I would.

    Lipo's are not something to mess around too much we all know.
     
  5. J.James

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    True you dont want to mess TO much with them

    But if its not taking a charge you can try switching the charger to the LeFe setting and charge it with that for about 2 minutes and that should get a few volts in it so the charger will see some voltage in it and trick it in to charging and then switch it over to Lipo and you should then get the red and green alternating LED showing its then charging and charge it at the 1A setting so its charging slow and keep an eye on it to make sure it dont swell.
     
  6. Cajvol94

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    This has happen to me when I raced 8th scale RC cars. Find a charger you can charge in Nimh and connect the battery for about 5-10 mins then put back on the lipo charger and all should be good. Voltage dropped to low for the Lipo charger to start its charge cycle.
    Good luck!
     
  7. tmartin62

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    I'm curious if you were able to revive your battery?

     
  8. slothead

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    I would buy a new battery (relatively cheap), and continue flying, and take your time figuring out the old battery. You may be able to revive it, and maybe not, but you will still be able to fly, and have a spare if you can revive it. BTW, in the old days (and don't take this as any means to revive your LiPo), sometimes a relatively high forced current could rejuvenate a open-circuited rechargeable battery. I forget which technology this applied to, and worse, the new LiPo technology could result in this same method blowing up in your face (literally). So be careful whatever you do.
     
  9. DiceOfSeven

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    Get a new battery
     
  10. deltamike

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    Messing around with Li-Po's is foolhardy to say the least.

    Bite the bullet and get a new one.

    If Boeing couldn't get it right, then take the hint.

    You could revitalize Ni-Cads but Li-Po is a BIG NO NO

    Regards

    Pete
     
  11. KimBrown

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    I'd forgotten about the Boeing problem.... Did they change the type of batteries they used in the end, or was it a charging problem.....

    As Paddy would say......
    Ya wouldn't have thought those little batteries would turn them big jet engines....... lol
     
  12. deltamike

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    Heh heh.

    Some info :-

    The fire in the 777 cabin was due to the crushing of a lithium battery that fell into a seat mechanism. The crushing caused an internal short-circuit and overheating that caused the fire.
    Turning off the video system electrical power supply before any other action was an effective protection against the risks associated with the many items of equipment installed in the seats.
    The cabin crew member then put out the fire by reflex by throwing water onto the flames. Throwing the water put out the flames and cooled the damaged battery. Nevertheless, this could have revived the fire and made its extinction more difficult, due to the release of hydrogen generated by the reduction of lithium in the water.
    The new procedure put in place by Air France that recommended initial use of halon resolved this difficulty but implied the emission of a potentially noxious gas that is bad for health. Its use in the cockpit could clearly be dangerous.
    In the United States, the FAA recommends a slightly different procedure: it suggests turning off the electrical power supply, putting out the flames with halon or water, then cooling the device in order to stop internal reactions.
    No procedure has been universally established to contain this type of fire in the cabin or the cockpit.
    4 - RECOMMENDATION
    Note: In accordance with Article 17.3 of European Regulation (EU) 996/2010 of the European Parliament and Council of 20 October 2010 on the investigation and prevention of accidents and incidents in civil aviation, a safety recommendation shall in no case create a presumption of blame or liability for an accident, a serious incident or an incident. The addressee of a safety recommendation shall inform the safety investigation authority which issued the recommendation of the actions taken or under consideration, under the conditions described in Article 18 of the aforementioned Regulation.
    Many studies are currently under way on the danger relating to transporting the various types of lithium batteries in cargo holds. Nevertheless, the danger represented by transporting them in the cabin has not been taken into account.
    Faced with a lithium battery fire, actions to extinguish the flames then to cool the components are required to stop any internal reaction. There is no consensus on the procedure to apply, specifically on the use of water during extinction of the flames.
     
  13. stony30

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    Get a new lipo to be on the safe side and dispose of old one safely.
     
  14. J.James

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    TO be sure you dispose of old one safely. Send it to me I will make sure its disposed of properly
     
  15. tobbe

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    NOT SO FAST!

    This happened to me, my fc40 got stuck in a tree overnight and the NeXT day the battery was of course all dead..
    I tried putting it into the charger of course and nothing happened..
    I tested it With a voltmeter and it was 2-4 v only..
    I have had some batteries in the past With protection breakers on them like the 18650 batteries and i had forgot to charge my flashlight for many months and found it all dead and batteries so dead the charger didnt recognize them.
    All i did was take away the protection and give them a minute on the charger to boost them a little and put back the protection on them, and then they would charge just fine.

    In this case i took a normal car battery and hooked + to + and - to - and counted to 40 or 60 Seconds and then i had about 9v on my fc40 battery and VOILA i put it in the charger and it was charging just fine..

    HAve used the battery for over a month now, as i dont have any other yet due to some ebayseller not sending me my batteries so i have wasted time waiting, so just give them a little careful Jumpstart and ull be fine.
    dont mix the + and - and do it slowly and carefully..
    Your battery is gonna be fine is my prediction as mine IS.
     
  16. pert

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    and order 6 more of them. and a good charger. don't fly the piss out of them, and they will last you a few years. thing is don't kill them. be nice to them, also a good idea to charge them out side, or on a metal tray.
     
  17. J.James

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    You do need to be careful using a car battery to get some charge on the lipos to get the charger to recognize they are plugged in.
    A car batty can deliver a heck of a lot of amps and can puff a lipo if you have it on for even a few seconds to long. it can also harm the internal resistance and will make the battery lose some flight time even when its fully charged. So its best to just use a 12v power supply that has much lower amperage or a 9v battery if you can.

    But the reason the dont charge when the voltage is to low is not because of the liop packs we use in the phantoms having any protecting circuit built in to the battery Like them protected 19650 flash light battery's have in the battery's

    BTW I freaking hate the protected 18650s I have for my flash lights and also a hand held burning Lazar. Because of them locking them selves out if they fall below or go over the cutout voltage of the internal protection circuit.


    and its the charger that has the under voltage protection in it. My duratrax charger wont let me charge any liop if its under 9v for more then about 5 seconds before it gives me an voltage to low error. Tho the DJI its some were about 7v or under that it just wont charge. Tho I have figured out another trick on either charger i can pull the banna plug out a tiny bit and just touch a 9volt to the connectors while the battery is plugged in and it make the chargers see the voltage being about 9v and will send a charge. Tho you want to for the first charge still charge it at the slowest rate. Because when the battery is really empty it will take as much amps as the charger is putting out. Some good battery's can take the full rate but the OEM dji battery's do not like being charged at a very fast rate. Tho when they are closer to full the output even when its set at 2amps will drop back to even less then putting out 2amps as the battery gets fuller and fuller.
     
  18. kyledettman

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    I recently completely drained a High Sierra 3-cell 2200mAH 35c battery that was attached to my FPV monitor, and was also unable to charge it with my old Phantom balancing charger.

    I connected the battery to the charging leads (that go into my BC20-4 balancing charger), then held those leads onto a fresh 9v battery for about 1 minute (being careful to watch for swelling or odd smells). After that, I connected the battery to the charger and it started charging again (LiPo - 1A setting).

    The battery charged successfully, and seems to be working normally now. I'll keep an eye on it and report back if anything goes wrong.

    Though this worked for me without incident, still be very very cautious if any of you decide to try this technique. Watch the battery very carefully and never leave it unattended while charging. If anything looks suspicious, stop at once and dispose of the battery properly. It's simply not worth the danger.
     
  19. tmartin62

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    It seems a little risky but I have heard of people doing that before with success.

    If I had enough nerve to try it (honestly, I probably would), I think I would do it outside away from my house :)