Welcome to PhantomPilots.com

Sign up for a weekly email of the latest drone news & information

Do you need to look at the aircraft or the device ?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by xbiron, Dec 11, 2015.

  1. xbiron

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hi guys,

    I'm a beginner and I have a a P3P. I have done some flights with it and i'm really happy of it.
    But I wonder what's the best way to fly it safely, while getting nice shots.

    If I'm looking at the aircraft, I'm abble to control it easily (if it doesn't go too far).
    If I'm looking at the device on the remote, I can control the video and get the shots I want. But i'm affraid of not totally being in control of the aircraft and miss some obstacles that I don't see well on the video (high trees or power line).
    And if I'm looking at both, time to time, it's pretty hard to control it and figure what I'm doing.

    Do you guys have some good tips for me to improve my skills ?

    Thank you.
     
  2. tcope

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Messages:
    3,552
    Likes Received:
    1,396
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    I scout the area first. This usually involves looking at Google Maps before hand and then spending a few minutes looking around where I will be flying. If I fly long distances I usually fly at around 300 feet as this helps to avoid most everything. After work I'm going to get some night photos of a large tree that is lit up. I'll go there during lunch and look around.

    Take is slow and pay attention.
     
  3. Jacob

    Jacob Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Messages:
    737
    Likes Received:
    305
    If you want the absolutely safest way, products like the Epson BT-200 let you view the aircraft and see your live view at the same time.

    If you don't want to shell out the ~$500, I usually watch the aircraft, then when its time to get the 3-7 second money shot, I watch the live view, with periodic glances to the aircraft. As said above, check out the area before you fly and you will know your "danger zones". Remember: Trees don't move :)
     
  4. beeline

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    53
    Location:
    North Alabama
    I'd recommend a spotter at first, if not always. I happen to be married to one.
     
    dirkclod likes this.
  5. xbiron

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    4
    Ok thanks guys for the tips.
    @beeline what's a spotter ?
     
  6. beeline

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    53
    Location:
    North Alabama
    Someone who will watch your back and your bird at all times.
     
  7. xbiron

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    4
    Oh ok, now I understand why you've married one lol.
     
  8. Skywalker

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2015
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    81
    I sleep with mine...

    (My spotter, not my drone! )
     
  9. JustinJ

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Dorset, UK
    How does your wife feel about that? Haha :)