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7th channel gimbal switch output frequency hz?

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by gfredrone, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. gfredrone

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    So I've installed my DJI 7th channel control and am trying to figure out the difference from the 200 hz stock setting and the now available 400 hz setting. 400 hz seems more responsive regarding lag but that may be my imagination.

    What are the technicalities with the different hz settings and at 400 hz do I risk burning up the stock gimbal servo? Thanks for the info in advance. I'm :mrgreen: with all this RC stuff.

    Edit: In the settings it says the chosen output frequency is recommended not to be more than the maximum supported frequency of the servo.

    Does anyone know the maximum supported frequency of the stock gimbal servo?

    What does the output frequency do?

    Is a higher frequency more power thus moves the servo faster?
     
  2. gfredrone

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    Googled this up:

    There are two types of servos in the market, the analog and the digital servos. There is no difference in how the servo is controlled by the user. The main difference is how the motor is driven by the servo controller.

    The motor of an analog servo would receive a signal from the servo controller (AKA amplifier) at about 30 to 50 times a second. And this is the position refresh speed of the servo. On the other hand, digital servos can achieve position refresh rates up to 400 times per second.

    By updating the motor position that often, the digital servo can deliver full torque from the beginning of movement and increases the holding power of the servo, about 3 times higher! The quick refresh also allows the digital servo to have a tighter dead-band. Moreover, the response of the servo is significantly increased, and in conjunction to the increased holding power and the faster max torque delivery, the digital servos can accurately set and hold a position on the shaft.

    Digital servos can be programmed for direction of rotation, center and end points, fail-safe option, speed, and dead bandwidth adjustment. You do not need to worry about programming as most of the digital servos operate like normal servos out of the box and require no programming.

    A main drawback of digital servos is that they are much more expensive than analog servos, and require more power from your batteries.

    The power supply of servos is usually from 4.6 to 6 volts, and that could vary between manufacturers and types. For maximum torque and speed achievements, you should supply the servo with it's maximum nominal voltages.

    As mentioned before, servos are controlled with a PWM signal driven to their signal wire. A PWM signal has three parameters that characterizes it: The first is the amplitude (or peak to peak voltage) of the signal. You should use from 3 to 5 volts for your signal, according to it's specifications. The second is the frequency. In PWM, the frequency is usually fixed to a value. For analog servos the frequency is 30-50 Hz, and for digital servos it is 300 to 400 Hz.