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Why doesn't DJI offer low-priced quads for kids ???

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by MadMitch88, Nov 29, 2014.

  1. MadMitch88

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    Well as expected --- my 9 yr. old and 7 yr. old nephews were over today and were instantly enchanted by my P2V+ and wanted to fly it. :)

    Of course, most of us who ain't named Bill Gates are going to be very leery of letting a little kid have full control of our expensive birds, so I made sure to keep my hands on their hands as they worked the sticks. They didnt seem to like this technique --- as most boys their age think they're experts at everything, right? :roll:

    Why doesn't DJI market an affordable low-end quad aimed at the kid market? Not only would it be a very lucrative niche --- but also a good way to instill brand loyalty so they buy more expensive DJI products when they get older. Microsoft is very skilled at this technique --- offering "student versions" of their Office product at $99, hoping that many high school and college students will grow up and buy the $500 version of Office once they get real jobs.

    Anyone know if the Blade 180 QX would make a nice Xmas gift for my nephews? It says 720p camera and RTH capability for a $200 quad --- little more than I wanted to pay but still impressive amt. of features for that price range? How stable is the video from this unit? Easy to fly? What is the max. range on this puppy?

    http://www.amazon.com/180-QX-HD-RTF-SAFE/dp/B00G5AX1YQ

    [​IMG]
     
  2. p fandango

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    thats a bit like asking why don't Ferrari make milk-floats. DJiI's target area is from the hobbyist to the professional flyers
     
  3. MadMitch88

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    Last time I checked --- DJI is a business and most businesses are in the business of making money.

    Go hang out at a Toys R Us this weekend and then tell me there isn't a lot of money to be made from a sub-$200 quad for kids.

    Boys age 8 and up get quickly bored with Lego sets, friend.
     
  4. p fandango

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    agreed. But my points still valid, its not there area there not aiming at the toy side of the quad market. Theirs also got to be more profit in the upper end of the market than the minimal margins out of an already flooded budget pocket quad market
     
  5. MadMitch88

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    I guess you're right --- but they are foolish to adopt Apple's arrogance in trying to lock down a certain segment of the market as their own and then charge high prices in that niche. Apple's iPhone and iPad market share has dropped in recent years because of stiff competition from Samsung and others. Apple learned a painful lesson from being arrogant about their customers' loyalty.

    Give it a couple years and DJI will be begging to get into the budget toy market --- after 3D Robotics and Walkera start eating their lunch in the hobbyist-level niche.
     
  6. Monte55

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    Cheap brushed motor quads don't last long without replacing motors. I'm sure DJI doesn't need to be associated with more complaints. They already have enough complaints.
     
  7. MacCool

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    Yeah. Apple is in a lot of pain these days. :D Seems to me that their market cap just hit $700 billion?

    It takes money to make money. If capitalization is being utilized to maintain their core market, and given the introduction of new models and new versions, it apparently is, it becomes expensive and diverting to branch out into areas (toys) where the competition is stiffer.

    If somebody is going to eat DJI's lunch, my money is on GoPro if they decide to enter the market. But they're not going to make toys either. No money there - too expensive, no good return on investment in an effective time frame. I'm guessing.
     
  8. HailStorm

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    What a stupid idea.

    I bet you want GoPro to make you a $20 camera to strap on it too?
     
  9. MadMitch88

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    Market cap doesn't mean much --- didnt Amazon have a market cap of $500 billion all those years they were losing money? Seems like a flimsy way to truly determine real value of a company. And don't be telling me Wall Street is smarter than the rest of us --- those Wall Street *** clowns are the ones who thought subprime mortgages were a great idea for our economic growth. :p

    "Maintaining a core market" is one of the surest ways for a company to leverage it's way into extinction. Remember when IBM arrogantly declared itself "invincible" in the 70's and 80's for the personal computer market? By 1995, they were pretty much out of the PC business and barely survived by angling into the software-services market. I can remember Dell making those same bold claims and now they are on the verge of oblivion as well.

    DJI can do whatever it wants --- but I'm seeing the same predictable behavior from them as these once-formidable tech companies.

    RIP, DJI. :p
     
  10. MadMitch88

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    LOL, you are so clueless about how the market works, buddy.

    My guess is that GoPro would make an extra $20 billion in net revenue if they could figure out how to design a weatherproof 1080p camera for $20. Everybody and their Grandma would want one, and that's worldwide. If they want to be around in the next 10-15 years, I would bet you $100 they are already working on it. It's called "core product diversification" --- probably a term too complicated for your level of education.

    Stick with your high school teaching job and let us real entrepeneurs handle the free market demands, bub.
     
  11. MacCool

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    See, you are either completely clueless, or you're trolling.

    I can never tell. I'll give you the benefit of a doubt and assume cluelessness.
     
  12. MadMitch88

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    LOL --- I just gave you clear examples of once-huge companies that went into oblivion with their arrogant "just focus on our core market" approach --- and you respond with that.

    Schooled ya, bro. :lol:
     
  13. MacCool

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    Yah, OK bud.
     
  14. steveeds

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    1980's, IBM asks NEC to supply them with 10,000 IC's.

    Knowing their own failure rate in producing these IC's they ask for an extra side box of 500 (just incase).

    When IBM received the shipment the extra box had a note on it, "Please find 500 IC's we produced in a damaged condition, we have no idea why you want these"

    It's all about expectations
    Plus it was a fun story


    I want a kids version of a Veyron, really I want a Veyron but one tenth the price.