Welcome to PhantomPilots.com

Sign up for a weekly email of the latest drone news & information

Tourist planning to fly in the US

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by nonameuser, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. nonameuser

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hey guys and gals

    I live in Canada and often visit the US. Now that I have a P3P I thought I'd bring it along so I wrote the FAA to find out the rules. So FYI, there is their answer:

    Thank you for your inquiry. Everyone, including foreign nationals and tourists, who operate a UAS for hobby or recreational purposes outdoors in the U.S. must use the FAA's online registration system.

    These non-U.S. citizens or non-permanent U.S. residents will receive the same registration certificate as U.S. Citizens or permanent U.S. residents. However, this certificate will function as a "recognition of ownership" document. This document is required by the Department of Transportation for these foreign nationals to operate legally in the US.

    In order to use the online registration platform, you must be located within the U.S. or its territories or possessions.

    At this time, the registration system cannot accept foreign addresses, although it is expected to in the future. For the next several weeks, a person with a United States address must register the small unmanned aircraft on your behalf and provide their address and payment information.

    The FAA will assume a bailment agreement exists between you and that person in this instance, as referenced in 14 CFR 48.25.
     
    eaglegoaltender likes this.
  2. eaglegoaltender

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    273
    Bailment describes a legal relationship in common law where physical possession of personal property, or a chattel, is transferred from one person (the 'bailor') to another person (the 'bailee') who subsequently has possession of the property.

    Yikes - best you know the person very well prior to that deal. Not sure if I would have asked the FAA prior to a visit - hmm - then again if anything happened, ignorance of the law - as they say - is no excuse!

    So, nonameuser - are ya still taking your bird and flying it south of the border?

    Thanks for posting that - great info to have if I ever travel that way with mine!
     
  3. nonameuser

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    4
    Yes, I'm just looking into the insurance side of things now but I'll take it along for sure. I like rules so I just wanna make sure I do this right.

    I have very good friends down there the bailment part is not an issue.
     
  4. 1340

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2015
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Let us know how the insurance works out.
    Thanks.
     
  5. nonameuser

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    4
    From what I can see, if I am flying recreationally, I don't need specific coverage. I basicaly qualify as a hobbyist.
     
  6. henriquedecampos

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    How can I get the license if I don't have an address in US or a American credit card ? Is there any other payment method?