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Quad "training wheels"?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by GearLoose, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. GearLoose

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    I'm quite interested in using a Phantom to survey and monitor small forested reserves for a local environmental group. I've never operated an R/C quad or plane, however, so I'm concerned about the best way to go about this. I have access to large open areas for DIY training but after viewing so many noobie crash videos I'm wondering if I shouldn't start with a much smaller toy quad?

    I'd enjoy starting right off with the Phantom but my budget is limited so I do want to reduce the risks as much as possible.

    What do you think? If I start with a "toy", can you suggest a model that would be most appropriate? I won't be doing acrobatics!

    thanks!
     
  2. telecaster

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    Location:
    Drøbak, Norway
    The Phantom is so stable on its own so you can say that the Naza unit inside is working as
    electronic "training wheels". You do not really need anything else, the Phantom is very
    kind and forgiving, just go ahead.
    Good luck and enjoy!!
     
  3. Sac D

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    Location:
    Northern California
    I bought a UDI U816A for around $50 complete, to learn the basics. I quickly moved on to the Phantom... which is actually even easier to fly than my "beginners" quad. There are quite a few micro quads for under $100 that you can try out first... see if you enjoy flying one, then go from there.

    I still have the U816A - my little grandaughter really likes it so we use it a lot indoors so she and the dog can chase it around.
     
  4. FTZ

    FTZ

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    If you are looking for a "toy" trainer, check out this guy. Great indoor/outdoor ability. Decent size for outdoor flight. Extremely durable, and dirt cheap.

    http://www.nitroplanes.com/56h-x1-ufo.html

    As telecaster said though, the Phantom itself is a trainer. It is easier to fly than any of the toy quads.
     
  5. pwright

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    Location:
    Las Cruces, NM
    I wouldn't bother. I had no experience at all with RC prior to getting the Phantom and it is incredibly easy to fly. I probably have 20 batteries worth of flights or so and have never crashed it.

    As for your intended use...

    It can be very tricky to fly at a distance as it is so small that you will have a hard time seeing which way it is pointing. Home Lock mode will help getting it to come back to you. The other issue will be pointing the camera at what you want to see. Shooting video instead of stills will give you some latitude to play with but a FPV setup would allow you to actually see where the camera is pointing.

    Be aware that if you are do this for pay you will be in violation of FAA regulations.
     
  6. GearLoose

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    I appreciate the advice you've offered and am leaning heavily toward starting off with the Phantom rather than a practice toy.

    Although I'm attracted to the idea of building a quad from parts or a kit, it seems that the Phantom's ready-to-fly price would be very hard to beat.

    Another factor which I haven't yet read any discussion on is weather protection. All of the DIY quads I've looked at have completely exposed components. It is often foggy, misty, or suddenly raining where I live, so I'm hoping that the Phantom's shell will provide at least reasonable protection from moisture.