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Preventing compass errors mid-flight

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by bohdud, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. bohdud

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    I've heard that the biggest cause of loss of control of a drone (apart from high winds) is compass error. I've also seen a number of videos where the drone does not report a compass error at takeoff, but obviously not all compass errors can be detected, and a subsequent problem happens during flight.

    Would taking off from a cardboard box or other non-metallic surface about 0.5-1m above the ground help prevent some fairly common compass errors? Are there other good practices beyond following a pre-flight checklist and staying away from obvious metal objects that can prevent hidden compass errors causing problems while in the air?

    Keen to hear everyone's thoughts!
     
  2. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    It's easy to get the wrong impression reading of some users problems and imagining that the majority of users are having similar problems.
    The compass in a Phantom is usually very reliable and trouble-free.
    I have seen a few cases lately of Phantoms with troublesome compasses and they had to go back for replacement.
    But most users would never see a compass error at all.
    The only times I've seen a compass error is when I've purposely put the Phantom on a car roof or manhole cover for demonstration purposes.
    As long as you don't calibrate the compass in a bad area and you don't try to launch from a car roof, or on reinforced concrete etc, you'll probably never see one either.

    btw ... A compass error doesn't mean there is a problem with the compass.
    It's usually a perfectly good compass telling you that it has detected a problem with the local magnetic environment, usually due to a lot of steel nearby.
    In this case, you should not recalibrate the compass there simply simply moving to a magnetically clean area is the solution.
     
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  3. alokbhargava

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    My guess is that most of the problems start after it lands hard or goes through a crash. Any connector getting loose will create problem at any time during the flights. Electronics usually have a long life if operated in correct ambient conditions. Other elements that can cause problems are motors, ESC , props and batteries. Key to success would be maintenance and correct operations.

    Keep checking calibrations once a while will keep things fit and give you long good experience.


    Sent from my iPhone using PhantomPilots
     
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