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Perseid meteor shower

Discussion in 'Photos and Video' started by Tricky, Aug 12, 2015.

  1. Tricky

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    okay kids...i have less than 40 flights, and 65k feet of travel, BUT, would anyone know what kind of settings, positioning, if possible at all, would work for tonights meteor shower? they say it will be extra brilliant this year bc tonight is also a new moon, meaning less skylight for better viewing

    i live in a small urban area, but can drive a few miles away and be free from downtown lighting.

    just curious if my P3P will at all get me some awesome pics/videos

    thanks!
     
  2. TeamYankee

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    I very much doubt you would see anything on the P3 camera to be honest... just not sensitive enough.
    Plus you would need multi-second exposures and any movement will ruin the shot.
     
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  3. Tricky

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    im still learning exposure and iso....maybe you could tell me what setting on the p3p camera sets the "exposure time?" i grabbed this pic after a storm came through last night...i was making adjustments mid-air, but had no idea what i was changing...a little knowledge would go a long way for me...thanks! wpss.jpg
     
  4. Justgregg

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    use the 3 shot bracket feature..works good.
     
  5. Bag1

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    ISO is another way to express sensitivity to light. In full sun you'll be at 100, as light available decreases the ISO goes up to get the same exposure. You're other setting is shutter speed, expressed as the denominator part of "fraction of a second" so 1000 = 1/1000 second (or the shutter will be open for 1/1000 of a second.) As that number gets up to 1/1 of a second it's written as 1"
    Best bet (and I know I'm late on this) is to point your camera in one direction and use a long shutter speed along with the lowest ISO you can (because oh yeah as ISO goes up, graininess goes up.)
     
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