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dji phantom vision in cold temperatures and about cases

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by jusju, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. jusju

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    Dear all,

    Do you know if "type 61" is the right back pack for phantom vision 2 case? This case is sold at amazon.

    Also, has anybody tried to fly phantom in freezing temperatures? I think there might be a lot of condensated moist in camera and outside of camera with huge temperature changes?

    Thanks for info,

    Jukka
     
  2. Todesengel

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    Don't know about the case, but i flew mine last week in 18 'f . was filming a small waterfall that was half frozen. Only problem i ran into, was that the props are not flexible at all at that temp, and i broke one all to pieces when i landed and tipped a bit.
     
  3. ladykate

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    Location:
    Bellevue, NE
    Coldest I've flown was about 12 degrees. Not really a choice around here - it has been below freezing for a while and will be for a couple more months. It was windy and darn uncomfortable at 12 degrees.

    Here is a (mercifully short) video of flying in freezing weather... temp was mid-20s in this one. Notice the very cool landing - picked the only spot in a 50 yard circle that had weeds high enough to hit the props. ;-}

    I suspect the post about stiff plastic really applies - strange things happen when it gets cold. Wouldn't want a really hard landing. However, I was pushing the props a bit which you can hear on the video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDrH8_wn ... e=youtu.be
     
  4. WReimer

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    I live in the middle of the Canadian Prairies, and fly several times a week. The average temperatures on my flying days are around -20-22C, with the coldest day of lying I've done at -33C. I have a small, one man hunting blind with a built-in folding lawn chair...I guess in actuality it's a lawn chair with a hunting blind mounted on the back of it. Regardless, I set it up, and put my little Buddy propane heater in it to keep me warm and out of the wind. I open up the main front shooting port for landing & taking off, so I can visually monitor it while I put on my Fatsharks ( this time of year I fly mostly FPV).

    You can avoid fogging by letting your camera acclimate to the outside temperature before you turn it on to go flying. It's very easy to take out the battery on the go-pro, so I do that to keep it warm, then set things outdoors for 10 minutes or so first to "cool down" Once it's cooled off a bit, it won't fog up nearly as easy. If you're still getting fogging problems, take a dryer sheet (Downy, etc) and wipe the inside and outside of the lens port on the GoPro with the dryer sheet. It will keep things from fogging up pretty well. You can also use a small bit of shaving cream; rub it on, then buff thoroughly, it will keep fogging under control very well.
     
  5. hilitephoto

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    Don't forget to put your Phantom in a Large Zip Lock bag before going into your home. The condensation will eventually destroy your Phantom.
     
  6. Cheesehead Dave

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    As far as the GoPro is concerned, if you're using the waterproof case, leave it sealed up when you bring it inside until it comes to room temperature. The sealed case will prevent the humidity of the room from being able to condense on the cold camera.

    I also keep a lot of my accessories in a Lock-n-Lock container which will also limit the amount of humidity that can accumulate when bringing it indoors from a cold environment.