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Carbon Fibre Blades

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Discussion' started by wilko, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. wilko

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    So I have just purchased a Pv2+ and I have also purchased some carbon fibre blades..

    NEW 9443 Self Tightening Lock Carbon Fiber Propeller CW/CCW DJI Phantom 2 Vision
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-9443-Self-T ... 0418914207

    Have made a wise purchase or have I just spent money on nothing... Let me know and if there is a better place to get this type of blade please let me know..

    i just want to get a little more stability which I am assuming CF blades will give me...


    Ta

    Wilko the newbie
     
  2. aartsf

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    Where is your assumption that cf props give you more stability is based upon? In my view cf prpos have only thisadvantiges, namely they having a greater risk of danging stuff and they have a greater risk of breaking.
     
  3. wilko

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    That is just what I have read in reviews on the tinterweb o I guess it must be true ! Is that view from fact or just what your assumption is ?
     
  4. aartsf

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    There a a lot reports of broken cf prop on the internet. Is also logical as they are rather rigid while thin. Plasic props are more flexible and are therefore less likely to break in (mild) crashes. Further cf props will act as surgical knifes when meeting (human) tisue. Plastic while also harm the tissue, but the dammage will be far lees. Also in this respect you can find the evidence on the internet.
     
  5. Lucan

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    I am using both stock and cf. the CF are .5 gram lighter(each). Flight characteristics seem to be equal. VRS seems to be easier to induce with CF so I would be careful. Also they will do serious damage should you bump into something. They do hold up if you inadvertently tip over upon landing. I've only done a half dozen flights with CF before switching back but that's just my 2 cents.
     
  6. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    I haven't seen anything credible indicating any improvement using CF props.
    Just lots of people assuming it must be better.
     
  7. Forts

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    I recently picked up some CF props myself and they are indeed very rigid. Haven't really noticed any difference in flight, but when I was putting the Phantom back in the car and one of the props rubbed the door, it sure left a hell of a scratch!
     
  8. rbhamilton

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    These are absolutely perfect if you need to fly your drone through a herd of zombie's. Razor sharp and very stiff - perfect for chopping things. Otherwise... mmm... I'd probably stick with the ones DJI sells.
     
  9. Fplvert

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    :) yep, keep a set for angry birds. :lol:
    Otherwise the 9450 ones are really nice. Especially at altitudes over 4000' ASL the extra lift is really needed! :D
     
  10. singapore_phantom

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    There's no evidence in aviation for better flight characteristics when flying with a rigid wing or rotor, as opposed to one that flexes a little. In fact, if you look at all things that fly, they all have a certain amount of bend in the surfaces that keep them in the air, whether it's a bird or a plane or a chopper rotor, they all flex a little. This ensures that any sudden spikes in wing load can be dissipated by the flex.

    The other thing that I find strange about using carbon rotors is that whilst carbon is very light and quite resilient to torque forces inflicted on it (which is why they're used in fishing rods, windsurf masts and bicycle frames etc.) carbon is terrible at absorbing direct impact blows. It dinks easily. This is a major trade-off with carbon.

    It's the little flaws caused by these dinks that are dangerous, because you can't always see them. But next time you fly your copter at 1000 feet, that flaw may reach snapping point.

    Not to mention the much less forgiving nature when carbon rotors come into contact with skin and flesh.
     
  11. Gilbert Gomes

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    It's all about the design and application. Your blanket claim is ridiculous.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QNRpSkTGoA

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SA1jVQu-Fgk

    etc.

    etc.
     
  12. AnselA

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  13. singapore_phantom

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    Interesting you should post that clip. After wielding the hammer on the bicycle fork, the gentleman says "You can see that the carbon layers have not been punctured or cracked". Followed by "We don't recommend riding the fork after this much damage."

    This is what I stated in my post just now. I.e. after impact, you may not see any of damage done with the naked eye, but that doesn't mean there isn't any damage. In fact, as the gentleman in the clip rightly states, using that item is no longer recommended. And this applies to prop, mast, fishing rod and bicycle fork.
     
  14. Gilbert Gomes

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    Watch the videos again. They closely follow my experience with carbon handlebars, bike frames, windsurfing booms, windsurfing masts (one is almost 20 years old and has survived many "dinks" against rip rap), etc.

    "Carbon" is not necessarily terrible at absorbing impacts. Again, it's all about the design and application.