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Can I use regular solder on top of lead free?

Discussion in 'Zenmuse H3-2D GoPro Gimbal' started by frankieplus, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. frankieplus

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    I heard that the Phantom board uses the lead free high temperature solder.

    So I'm going to be either replacing the board with the new upgrade kit that's released or maybe install
    a Zenmuse Go Pro Gimbal.

    But some soldering needs to be done either way - To solder power leads onto the existing Phantom Board's lead free solder
    joints, can I use regular solder or should I use lead free solder?

    If I need to use lead free which one should I use? Or is there just the one type? I know nothing about load free solder and weather or not it's good practise to head up the Phantom's lead free solder and solder a cable on top mixing in regular solder.

    -Frank
     
  2. Zircon

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    Well, Frank, I haven't actually done any soldeing yet, but I have the new upgrade board on the way, so It's only a matter of days before I will be. From what I can see of DJI's video, there sems to be enough solder on the board now. It looks like they just melt it and stick the wire in. However, I would certainly want to tin the wires with solder first before adding them, so I guess you would have to make a choice then about the type of solder. Shouldn't be a problem to get lead free for the job, though, would it?
     
  3. will27

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    I just did a bunch of soldering on a basket case Phantom and had no problems with using leaded solder. You do have to use higher heat settings if you are using a variable soldering iron.
     
  4. bumper

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    The melting temperature of the lead free solder is higher than good ol' 60/40 (lead/tin), so yes, you'll need to turn up the heat some. Also, when pre-tinning the wires and soldering them in position, the little blob of solder will tend to "frost over" instead of staying nice and shiny, even though you are keeping the wire still until the solder solidifies to avoid a "cold solder joint". Guess it's the combination of lead free and lead/tin solder that causes that - - though the solder connection is just fine.

    bumper
     
  5. frankieplus

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    Actually Wil27 is right. I'll just use lead free solder at a higher temp..

    Does anyone know what temp my soldering iron needs to be set at?
     
  6. natscape

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    +1.

    I would also like to know this. :)
     
  7. bumper

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    Of course it depends on the mass of what you are soldering, and to a degree on the iron and the tip you are using, but:

    When soldering with 60/40 lead-tin, I set my iron for 200 C for small things and 250 C for larger. When soldering a new ESC on my Phantom, I set the iron at 300 C.

    bumper
     
  8. natscape

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    So at 300C it would be hot enough to melt the lead free solder that DJI used?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
     
  9. frankieplus

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    Hey Natscape,

    Which lead free solder did you use? Is there any specific type I should get.. Or is there only the one variety??
     
  10. tmcgowan

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    Just go to Radio Shack, they'll sell you the right stuff!



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  11. cbpagent72

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    I have my Hakko set at 450 degrees Celsius. I have been taught to set the soldering iron to the hottest temp that way you don't have to leave the hot to on the circuit board for as long.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk 2
     
  12. Audaciter

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    +1
     
  13. deluge2

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    When soldering large (relatively speaking) wires to large solder pads, this method is sound. I use 750 deg F, not the highest setting, but towards the top end. The other thing that can be helpful is to use a relatively large tip (for irons with different tip sizes and shapes) when not working on tiny components. Large tips carry a large amount of heat that can be rapidly transferred to the components to be soldered. Rapid heat transfer reduces the overall heating of the components/board. This reduces the extent to which solder flows up a multi-strand wire, beyond the tip where the desired solder join is located. It also reduces the risk that the circuit board solder pads will delaminate from the board substrate.

    More care is needed when soldering small components that are heat-sensitive. This is why in production settings thermostatically-controlled professional soldering irons even have lock-out modes that prevent users from increasing temps beyond a set maximum determined by thermal sensitivity of a particular board and/or components.

    Steve