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When do you use your ND32 (do you have an ND32)?

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by NotARubicon, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. NotARubicon

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    My ND8 feeds me jello so i've been using an ND32 on bright days - mostly in the desert with lots of sand and maybe some rocks but i'm seeing that with the 32 it's underexposed and the colors are muted. Even shooting in D-Log I can't pull it up to where it looks good.

    I've got an ND16 on the way but i'm curious when you use a ND32 or if you even bothered to buy one. Is it only good in snow on sunny days?
     
  2. alokbhargava

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    Deciding the filter grade is not that difficult. For example, if it is. Sunny day, start with ND 16. Set ISO to 100. Shutter to double of fps say 50. Check the exposure value. If you are getting higher exposures, you need to increase the ND to 32, if you are getting low exposure values, change it to 8 and so on. Try to see what gives you closest to zero exposure value. You can also pickup higher fps and start the process again.

    Finally it's your own taste/ choice. I'm sure you will know what you like most. I know some people like bright results with bright colors whereas others like not so bright and neutral colors.

    Also it depends what kind of post processing SW you have as that can dramatically change the effects seen on the videos.
     
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  3. Phantom-Four

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    Bright day in the desert sounds like ND32 to me. But then, it depends on what frame rate you shoot. You'll need a ND32 twice as fast when you shoot at 50/60 fps than when you shoot at 120fps

    And what alokbhargava said :)
     
  4. band318

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    My observation - as OP NotARubicon pointed out ND32 seems to really seems to mute the colors (even in a bright sunny day situation perfectly for ND32).. Especially turning green foliage into a shade of dark green difficult to recover in post processing also..

    In such situations (Anyway the ND32 situations are fairly rare/uncommon) using ISO200 & 1/50sec shutter speed with an ND16 filter would be a solution that will give you correct exposure & preserve the colors (especially the greens) much better..

    I only wish I had thought of this as clearly 2weeks earlier... I ordered a TacoRc 4 filter set.. Post-facto I have been thinking I should have settled for the 3piece set (ND4, 8, 16) and used the savings to buy a polarised (gel) filter..
     
    #4 band318, Apr 18, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  5. Phantom-Four

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    I have to admit, I've only used it over water. No idea what colors there are in the desert but then, the only desert I have ever seen was the Sahara.

    So I'm going to take your and OP's word for it. That said, any situation you can use ISO200 you wouldn't need an ND32. ND16 + ISO100 will give you the same shutter speed.

    Sorry to hear it turned out you wasted money on the filter though. It's an expensive enough hobby as is :(
     
  6. band318

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    it was not so much about the waste.. more than that I was pissed off about not thinking clearly about the decision..

    yes.. when I said ISO200 i meant ND16+ISO200.. edited my post for clarity..
     
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  7. matti

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    Hey I'm confused about the recommendation to use:

    Shutter speed = 2x FPS

    doesn't this mean:

    25 fps (= 1/25 s/frame) -> shutter speed 1/50 s
    50 fps (= 1/50 s/frame) -> shutter speed 1/100 s

    Right??

    ...but isn't it then:

    Shutter speed = 1 / (2 x FPS)

    I'm also confused when people say, for example, to "double the shutter speed" -- does it mean to switch from 1/100 s shutter speed to 1/200 s or 1/50 s ?!
     
  8. alokbhargava

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    It means two shutter operations per frame.
     
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  9. Phantom-Four

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    I was trying to figure out how to say it but I think that may be the best way
     
  10. Timelinex

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    I tried using my filters from PhantomFilters and honestly after a couple tests I never used them again. I did not notice any benefit in color or video. Keep in mind this is in super sunny Phoenix, AZ where the sun is about as strong as it gets.

    I do recognize that the filters also function to artificially lower frame rate to smooth out some motion, but I don't do any type of footage where this sort of thing is a problem. So for me, so far I have not seen a reason to use them. If anything it only potentially introduces problems (greater chance of flare with more lenses, possibly lower quality video because of either more surfaces to pass through or lower quality lens, etc..)