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What fps is better??

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by ElGuapo, Aug 18, 2016.

  1. ElGuapo

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    The P3P is capable of shooting video FHD quality (1920x1080p) starting at 24fps up to 60 fps, What provides better video quality, shooting at a higher fps or lower is better?.

    Am I better off shooting video in UHD (4096x2160p) and scale it down to FHD?. If so what is the recommended fps?.
     
  2. fastfed

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    fast motion video 60fps, anything else. 60fps

    if I could shoot at 90FPS I would. IMO it looks 100x better @ that speed and why many top youtube people shoot at that resolution/speed

    Even with my 4K TV, I still shoot 1080/60 because it simply looks better :)
     
  3. WetDog

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    Ah, grasshopper - you have opened a question that has many answers. And no answers.

    Of course, you can always use 'it depends'.

    24 fps is the 100 year old standard for film / cinema look. People are used to it and the various attempts to change it (i.e., Peter Jackson's 'The Hobbit' at 48 fps) haven't met with much success. 30 FPS is standard for television and so has, mostly by default, become standard for computer video (actually is 29.997 but we will ignore that for now).

    At the slower speeds, the image of course blurs when you move it. Again, we've grown up thinking this is normal and expected and film makers have a long history of using this to convey motion or other effects. Higher frame speeds pick up more detail. This may be useful for scientific / engineering / non artistic purposes but many people feel that it looks 'jittery' for most scenes. But if you're trying to capture snowboarders, it makes lots of sense.

    60 FPS is designed for fast motion. Unfortunately, DJI kinda botched the implementation and it looks pretty blotchy and has lots of artifacts. Perhaps they will fix this but it's been noticed since they first came out with that speed so don't hold your breath.

    For most people, 30 FPS is probably the right place to start. But you should understand what you are doing.

    fasted's contention that 1080/60 'simply looks better' would not be a popular statement. YMMV and of course, there is no accounting for taste. Perhaps for his particular type of shooting it works best but I would not just park my camera there. I use 4K 24 fps because I do mostly nature scenes with slow pans and transitions. When I try to capture eagles running around I use 1080/60 and curse DJI's engineers.

    This video explains it nicely.

    In terms of capture size, unless you need the 60 FPS and assuming you have a computer that can handle it, shooting 4K makes the most sense. It helps future proof your images - have you taken a look at the 640x480 stuff you did years ago? VHS? It also lets you crop the image which can be very useful. The 4K implementation in Phantoms isn't first rate by any means - too limited a bit depth (another technical discussion) and limited hardware (a bit too slow). But hell, it's only $1000. If you want pro stuff you need to add one or two zeros to the right side....
     
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  4. matti

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    I shoot 3840 x 2160 because unlike 4096 x 2160 it is 16:9. I currently output to 1980x1080 (I preserve selected original 4K .mp4 footage with original quality -- I make straight cuts with MPEG Streamclip in OS X. This way I can re-edit if necessary).

    Shooting even integer fps footage makes mixing them easier and with better quality. So stick to either 30 fps base (30-60-120-240 fps) or 25 fps base (25-50).

    For regular footage 30 or 25 fps is fine but action shots might benefit from 60 or 50 fps although they take more space and not all gear might play them without stutter (applies also to 4K).

    ...it seems that the world is going to 30 fps base so I might start using that, although almost all my old footage is 25p or 50i.
     
  5. WetDog

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    25 / 50 makes sense wherever PAL is used (Europe / ? Asia). 30 / 60 for people of the American persuasion.
     
  6. matti

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    I'm not sure if 25/50 makes sense even in PAL lands anymore.

    Somehow most mobile devices seem to have only 30/60 fps. Mixing equal FPS material is easier because frame rate conversions are messy.

    And AFAIK european televisions have a long time been capable of displaying both PAL and NTSC DVDs.
     
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  7. WetDog

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    That's interesting. Makes sense - otherwise you're transcoding for different markets. Which is about as silly as DVD regions.

    Oh. Wait....
     
  8. fastfed

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    we can discuss this to the end, if you like 4k, obviously right now 4k doesn't have a 60fps option , but when it does many will film with that.


    It's really simple, here are two videos 60/30 you make the choice in which one you like better




    also Avatar, amazing cinematography and I credit that to the 48fps Cameron shot in, and apparently he will be doing future movies @ 60fps
     
  9. WetDog

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    Yes, it's changing. That's why I said there was no right answer.

    The trick is to understand where the numbers come from and where they 're going and what you are doing. Just another variable in the workflow. Along with shutter speed, aperture (I wish), bit rate, color space, focal length (sigh, oh for an X5), ISO and many others.
     
    matti likes this.