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What Do You Consider "Dangerous" Flying?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by kevinm, Aug 2, 2016.

?
  1. Flying Too Fast (Absolute Speed)

    10.7%
  2. Accelerating/Decelerating Quickly

    7.1%
  3. Flying Close to Obstacles or People

    96.4%
  4. Descending Too Quickly

    14.3%
  5. Not Executing a Pre-Flight Checklist

    53.6%
  6. None

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Other

    10.7%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. kevinm

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    Hi all,

    I am doing research as far as what pilots consider to be "unsafe" or "dangerous" flying in a non-racing/non-sport setting (e.g. commercial Aerial Photography).

    The question could be rephrased as, "If you are overseeing a network of pilots flying with your company's equipment, what risks would you want to be notified of?"

    Definitely open to hearing more options beyond what I've included as choices in the poll.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. CThruU

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    Anything that unnecessarily exposes others to possible injury or property damage. Everything we do in life carries an inherent risk to others. Driving, walking around with an illness, etc. Excessive risk above that is my definition of dangerous.

    The rest of the list just exposes my budget to damage. However, an option of a combination of those possibilities might be more accurate.

    IMHO, of course.
     
  3. kevinm

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    @CThruU I agree that everything has an inherent risk to it. In your driving example, "hard-braking" is clearly a sign that you're probably driving too close to the person in front of you on a consistent basis. In that same light, I'm wondering what people feel are the "hard-braking" equivalents of flying a drone.

    Thanks for your input. Definitely appreciate you taking the time to voice your thoughts.
     
  4. Lonewolf

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    Simple. Not following the FAA rules for flying these things. More so, why would you ask such a completely ridiculous question?


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots
     
  5. kevinm

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    @Lonewolf I think it's a reasonable thing to ask what factors people feel lead to dangerous flying. Flying dangerously and flying in compliance isn't always a complete overlap.
     
    jogforfitness likes this.
  6. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    1, 2 & 4 are irrelevant if you are talking about Phantoms.
    The speed, acceleration and rate of descent are all set by DJI and going as hard and fast as the Phantom can is not too hard or fast.
    Where you choose to go hard and fast may be an issue, but that's covered in your other option about how close you fly to obstacles.
     
    kevinm likes this.
  7. BigAl07

    BigAl07 Moderator
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    1) Flying in restricted areas
    2) flying beyond operator's skills/abilities
    3) flying in inclimate weather
    4) pushing the aircraft beyond it's factory safety standards (low battery etc)
    5) flying outside of "Community Based Guidelines"
     
    GoodnNuff, turbulence and kevinm like this.
  8. kevinm

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    @Meta4 you bring up a good point that I didn't make clear in the original post. Definitely "where" you're flying fast plays a big role. Do you believe speed on its own does not increase the likelihood of a crash?

    @BigAl07 when you say "flying beyond operator's skills/abilities," do you mind elaborating? e.g. distance from yourself to the drone.

    I apologize if anyone feels these are rudimentary or basic questions. I have my own thoughts/opinions but it's good to hear thoughts from others (especially since many of you have flown much more than I have).
     
  9. BigAl07

    BigAl07 Moderator
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    It's not uncommon for a new Phantom Operator to take it out of the box, charge the battery and go flying. Never reading the manual.... never flying in MANUAL mode.... not understanding how Return to Home works..... not understanding airspace... not understanding FAA regulations....

    These are but a few items that would fall under "beyond operator's abilities/skills"
     
    kevinm likes this.
  10. CThruU

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    Maybe you need to define "dangerous." Speed on its own is only dangerous if I'm worried about the cost of repair or replacement of the drone. In a wide open field with no one around, there is no significant difference between 25, 35, 45 mph. Braking hard when there's nothing or no one to hit is irrelevant.

    It's only when you hit someone or someone else's property, or put them at risk of those, that it becomes a problem. Earlier you referenced an auto analogy. Speed is cited as an isolated factor in approx 5% of automobile crash deaths. It's the added factors of weather, traffic, driver distraction, DUI, etc that matter more.

    In addition, it would be difficult for me to hurt myself while flying in an isolated area just by increasing speed, unlike a single vehicle crash where I stand a greater chance of being injured.
     
    Mfoster82 likes this.
  11. ExcObs1

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    I think your premise leads to an undefinable conclusion.

    The FAA already has defined the answers to the question :)