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Violations while Flying

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Discussion' started by Skipholiday, Jun 28, 2014.

  1. Skipholiday

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    be aware that you can be in violation of local laws or ordinances where you fly.
    We must respect property where we fly.

    Always be polite and do not attract any more attention than is already being done by the media.
    I'm concerned we are going to be regulated to where we are grounded except on our own property.

    Many are being arrogant, flying over crowds, putting people and there property at risk and making us all look bad.
    If your UAV falls out of the sky at 4 or 500 hundred feet it can kill or permanently maim someone.
    If it crashes into the windshield of a vehicle it can cause an accident.
    You can and will be charged with the damage or injuries you cause.

    Some are very professional and make the best videos and take the best pictures I have ever seen.
    Many pilots are very skilled and have full control of their UAV's.
    Personally, I'm not a great pilot but I do take all precautions to be safe.
    I enjoy this hobby and I'm concerned it's about to become illegal because of carelessness.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. CRankin

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    I'd actually be willing to go to court and challenge any law or ordinance that prohibits this. The challenge would be based on two grounds:

    1. The FAA has stated time and time again that they're the sole agency that has authority over the skies above us. Therefore the town has no authority to regulate.
    2. The town is acting in a manner which constricts freedom of speech/expression by prohibiting one's ability to take photographs.

    Hopefully some of these ***&&@*@&#! towns will learn once they get a lawyer or two who smacks them down. I doubt it will ever happen, but it would be great to have someone sue a town which prohibits this and win some sort of multimillion dollar verdict which financially impacts the town's budget (especially if it would happen to put one "M. Larsen" out of a job :) ).
     
  3. Skipholiday

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    Similar to anything else.
    If users/pilots do not respect privacy and property of others it will be legislated and regualted to the point it is difficult to have fun legally.

    If you watch some of the videos on youtube you will see what I'm talking about.
    people flying over crowds over traffic etc... this is dangerous and has already caused accidents.

    It will get worse before it gets better.
    Similar to the rash of flyaways, Most were not caused by the UAV being damaged, most were pilot error.
    We must all be safe or risk being grounded.
    http://goo.gl/Pe5ly2
     
  4. SilentAV8R

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    Citing 36CFR1.5 appears to me that you were flying in a National Park. Is that correct??

    In general parks, cities, etc. can determine what is legal to do in their jurisdiction. The recent NPS ban clarified that you can fly OVER the park, you just cannot be standing IN the park when doing so. Seems stupid, but there it is.
     
  5. Skipholiday

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    this isn't my warning ticket. Its from another board.
    As much as I enjoy flying my Phantoms. I understand 100% why they should not be allowed in many parks.
    They are noisy and will scare wildlife.
    Flying around my farm scares my horses and I've also had birds attack my phantom. I try to be as non intrusive as possible.
    Respect for wildlife is as important as respect for people in my opinion.

    http://goo.gl/GHJEJh
     
  6. Dirty Bird

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    We are talking about public parks, NOT wildlife preserves. People are noisy, scary, and disruptive of wildlife too. Shouldn't we therefore ban people from parks? I thought the reason we had publicly funded and maintained parks was so PEOPLE could enjoy them? I don't think anyone would argue that flying over huge crowds of people is a bad idea, and if someone is doing something unsafe or stupid, I don't think anyone would have a problem with park officials asking them to stop. But most of these parks are lots of OPEN area devoid of people, and offer lots of great scenery to record and enjoy.

    Why should there be some sort of blanket ban? This is what happens when you get a government bureaucrat pinhead involved. Do you know in Maryland parks, they not only ban RC aircraft, they also ban RC cars. Even the little electric ones that make very little noise. Is someone going to get their toe run over by a toy Jeep?
     
  7. Skipholiday

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    I agree Dirty Bird. It all boils down to respect and being safe.
    I believe if we are considerate and safe we will avoid being ousted from every fun public area.
    Grand Canyon would be one of the coolest places I would love to fly and see no harm
    But if someone chases a bald eagle or tries to peer in a nest we will be governed and I would understand.
    Its all about respect now before it's too late.
    Seems I see new drone news daily and it's never positive.
    UAV's have so many good uses and they take pics and videos that you would never be able to get without them.
     
  8. DrJoe

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    Thankfully, it was only a warning. Had you violated a local ordinance, you could go before a municipal judge, that would rule you did in fact, violate the ordinance. Then you have the right to appeal. Depending on your location, you may appeal to the county and state superior courts, which may choose to either hear, or decline your appeal. You could then make a federal case out of it, seeking the federal courts to strike down the municipal ordinance as unconstitutional. That's a lot of legal fees to pay. Until someone does it, and the courts rule on the legality of local ordinances restricting flights in airspace, you are screwed if the authorities tell you to take a hike.

    If, on the other hand, there is no pertinent ordinance, you may have a local case. But if the cops decide to charge you disturbing the peace, good luck.
     
  9. Flying Cephlopod

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    It takes a lot of resources to hire an attorney, challenge things in court, etc.

    Not everyone has those resources to their avail.
     
  10. Skipholiday

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    Common since will help us but as we all know some people are going to scream and whine just because.
     
  11. petersachs

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    Um, who issued this ticket? What entity? What park? When was it issued, etc.
    It's entirely invalid.
     
  12. Flying Cephlopod

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    And remember that some of those people who "whine and scream" are drone fliers themselves, as is evident by discussions on this very forum.
     
  13. srandall25

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    all this recent excitement and the negative press is a real shame... i would love to say it hasn't effected my ability to enjoy flying but it has. I'm afraid that I'm going to be flying somewhere where I believe is public property and no regulations against it, and little population, and still be made an example of when some authority decides I was in violation of some ordinance. It could happen... So I try to fly 'under the radar' as much as possible. I don't fly nearly as much as I would like because I'm over cautious. I try to fly only in the early morning hours before people are awake and away from any neighborhoods. I feel like I'm at risk when I'm even in sight of a single person, let alone a highly populated area... because you just never know if someone is going to have an issue with it and report you and go crazy on you like we've seen in other videos...
     
  14. CRankin

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    Well, there are ways of dealing with the people going crazy on you part. If open carry is legal in your state (as it is in Virginia), go strap a firearm on your belt or thigh before you go flying. There probably aren't many people who are going to stop and think "Yeah, let's go get crazy on the guy carrying a weapon and flying a drone"... :)

    But seriously, I don't really worry about this stuff. The times I've been out flying when people have stopped by, they're more interested in seeing the quad and learning about what it can do. Bringing it in safely (preferably landing it) and then showing what it can do through the app with pictures and video generally captured imaginations. I've even had a few additional suggestions on possible business ventures with it beyond what I've been considering. I've found that when I'm willing to share a little bit about what it is and what I'm doing, people genuinely take interest. I look at it as fighting ignorance and the misstatements made by outdated, irrelevant, arrogant organizations like the FAA with truth and logic.

    I guess that some day I may run into the old busybody who wants to complain about it. And when that happens, I'll deal with it by suggesting to anyone who shows up that the property the quad was launched from (and the property it's flying over) is not owned by the person and therefore the activities are none of their business.

    I certainly hope that some day somebody takes the National Park Service to task for banning what is essentially one of the most innovative and interesting methods of free speech and expression to come along in decades. If I had a significant amount of wealth, I'd grab a couple attorneys and go fight the good fight - if for no other reason than to bloody the proverbial noses of another arrogant know-it-all group of federal clowns. But, unfortunately, that's not going to happen any time soon. So instead I'm just not going to any federal parks - or spending money at businesses around them. I've started treating places that ban my drone just like I do places that ban my firearms... if my stuff isn't welcome, then neither is my business or money. It's just that simple. There are plenty of other places in this country that I can visit without having to deal with a park ranger *sshat peeing in his pants because I want to get some cool photos.
     
  15. Phantom_Menace66

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    Ok hang on a sec.... If I'm in a park or wherever, no obvious signs of people anywhere. I launch my Phantom and fly it 300m or more away and it inadvertently flies over a crowd of 100 people congregating in the park, or flies over a road with vehicles on it, beyond the limits of my flailing eyesight, is that being irresponsible? I'm not going to go walking 500m in every direction to see if there's anyone around...
     
  16. N017RW

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    Whomever launched the a/c is the 'Pilot in command' and as such you are responsible.

    Period.
     
  17. DCGOO

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    Yes. That is being irresponsible.
     
  18. Dirty Bird

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    That's why we have FPV...so we don't do that! ;)
     
  19. tomas99

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    Agree that caution and respect and awareness is key.

    But on the other hand just accident wise there are so many thing that can hurt us all the time while on the move "out there" just for thoughts.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I will my self try to get the proper paper for this and have just started the process to get them. Easier to have something to show if ever needed, here there are administrative costs to get those .

    -Tomas
     
  20. Dirty Bird

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    Riding a wheelie on your bike isn't the brightest thing, but no one seemed to be around other than him. I don't suggest it in traffic. Talking on your cell phone? This is one of those pet peeves of mine where government goes too far. Its like zero tolerance for guns in school, so if a kid draws a gun, pretends his finger is a gun, eats his Pop-Tart into the shape of a gun, or brings his G.I. Joe into school he gets suspended. How many of you drive with both hands on the wheel? All the time? Really??? I don't see much difference in TALKING on the phone than talking to the passenger next to you, or dealing with the kids in the back seat. Most folks can chew gum and drive at the same time. Texting is a different matter as this clearly takes your eyes off the road. Let's face it...some folks just can't drive...phone or no phone! Why don't we deal with people for what they actually do, rather than imposing blanket and often needless rules upon them? Makes too much sense....