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Video in 1081 60fps or 720p 60fps?

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by asifm76, Mar 19, 2014.

  1. asifm76

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    What 60fps works better for the P2V camera? I took video in both and it seems like the 1080i 60fps is just a little bit more clear than the 720p 60fps?

    Wanted to know everyone else's thought on this? What video setting do you think works the best for P2V guys?

    Also when you publish your video online (youtube, vimeo) do you do anything to change the setting so it looks better online?

    What software are you guys using to edit and publish your videos?

    Thanks Guys.... sorry for all the questions.
     
  2. nintendrone64

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    The video in 1080 is definitely going to be a little bit better, and a little bit larger.

    Make sure when you export for Youtube videos, you export via H.264
    You'll find settings like these in Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere.
     
  3. asifm76

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    Thanks for the reply! I understand that the 1080 will be a little better but I was under the impression that the 1080i would not be really that much better than the 720p because the 1080i is interlaced rather than progressive? Or are you telling me that the 1080i is still better than the 720p?

    Thanks
     
  4. BenDronePilot

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    1080i will give you similar overall image quality to 1080p. Tho the only reason for using 1080i is if you want to do slow mo footage or have slightly smaller file sizes. YouTube compresses all uploaded videos so you will be loosing quality regardless of which setting you choose. Though the higher the quality your initial video the better regardless of the compression issue. Also youtube has excellent video stabilization which can make a bouncy video smooth and silky.
     
  5. asifm76

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    Ok so what you guys are telling me is that I am better off shooting in 1080i 60fps rather than 1080p 30fps?

    Thanks
     
  6. Mal_PV2_Ireland

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    I hate the youtube stabilisation, make it look like the video is trippy and as if it was shot on acid :shock:
     
  7. gfredrone

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    Stick with 1080 30p. No reason to use 60 interlaced format in a digital world as interlaced was developed for analog and is half frames. It's basically the same as 30p but harder to work with post.
     
  8. Seahorse

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    However, if you want to play clips in slow-motion, 60 fps makes for smoother footage... :ugeek:
     
  9. FlyingFox

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    I concur, 1080p or progressive is better, 1080i interlace is good for slow mo, bit was aimed at when we had the old tv' s
    Interlace doesn't handle fast motion to well and is from two fields .. Also as said above it depends on what you view the finished footage on also makes a difference ie CPU monitor or HD TV or tablets etc.
     
  10. gfredrone

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    Yes and no, depends on your editing software. If you have editing software that can extract the frames into fields then go for it. 30p and 60i are both 30 FPS.

    60i is 60 half frames per second. 30p is 30 full frames per second.

    Progressive footage should result in cleaner slow motion since it's captured as complete frames at your specified rate of 30p, so 30 complete frames per second. 60i interlaced footage is also 30 frames per second, but it's split into separate odd and even fields yielding 60 fields per second, rather than complete frames. When played back, the fields are interleaved very quickly and gives the illusion of complete frames. If you take a still image from interlaced video with a lot of motion, you will see some combing or a stepped pattern. If you slow down the interlaced footage playback rate, you will likely see the same, maybe as detail blurring.