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Using ND Filter on AUTO (vs manual)

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by cqr35, Sep 18, 2015.

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  1. cqr35

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    I've read the great posts about using ND filters in manual mode -- setting shutter speed to 2x frame rate, then using filter to get ev ~ 0.

    I am going to shoot a rowing race tomorrow in bright sunshine and obviously over water. I will be shooting into, away from and sideways to the morning sun. I fear if I set up for one of these lighting scenarios, when I turn I will over or underexpose.

    My question is would it do any good to use the right ND filter to slow the shutter to about 2x framerate BUT then shoot in Automatic? That way auto should choose a shutter and ISO combo that work for much of the time, but then adjust for the other scenarios.

    Make sense? Thoughts? Advice?
     
  2. Bobcat90

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    While in manual, you can use the little wheel on the right of the controller to make adjustments. Test it out just before your actual shoot. By all means use the histogram as you make adjustments with the wheel. Everything should be in the middle of the histogram. The little wheel is the key. I hope this helps
     
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  3. envisionabove

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    Bobcat90 is 100% spot on with the histogram. In fact you should google about and gain even more info on it.

    You will see some shifts in exposure with auto that's why many say lock it in manual. For photos does not matter as much.
     
    #3 envisionabove, Sep 18, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2015
  4. envisionabove

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    Look for the best settings thread...it's well done and all your questions will be answered.
     
  5. Chuck Young

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    How to Use Histograms

    There is a nice explanation of histograms. Biggest suggestion I have is avoid over-exposure especially any subject matter, it is gone forever. Try not to shoot toward the sun, especially morning and evening the water can blow your images out. Probably best to keep the P3 with the sun to it's back side. Take a look at your image with the sun reflecting toward the camera and rotate your polarizer to reduce the glare from the water.

    Good luck and happy shooting.

    Ps you might want to zip tie some floaties on your landing gear in case of an accidental water landing. And always insure your Home and return altitude is good to go before each flight.
     
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  6. Chuck Young

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  7. EPT160

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    Hi and yes you will be just fine using the ND's in auto mode. They do the same job in auto as they do in manual. They will bring down the automatically selected shutter speed - but just to a point when the P3 starts upping the ISO to compensate. Not sure at what shutter speed the P3 will settle at before it stops lowering it and instead starts to raise ISO. A test I must do!

    Use auto and your selected ND, then just use the '+' or '- ' EV values that are controlled by the finger wheel on the RHS of the RC. You can also apply this by watching the histogram, but I would suggest if you are close to boats with people and turning frequently, watch the position of the P3 instead.

    Auto exposure on the P3 is surprisingly accurate and does a good job. I would suggest that if you choose to shoot auto, dial in a -0.3 to -0.7 EV value. Sometimes looking down at water will tend to over expose in auto as the water is dark by nature, except if looking at sun reflections.

    Finally make sure your metering mode is not set to 'spot' meter. Try the center weighted option (my preference) or the average mode.
     
  8. 4wd

    4wd

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    Manual is all very well, but in changing light situations the auto does a better job and you won't see the step changes as you try to adjust it based on squinting at the screen in bright light.
    I'd agree with above post, have the ev on -0.3 or -0.7 and leave it on auto.
    You might use manual for any establishing shots over the location before where you have time to fiddle about before recording.
     
    dmark1867 likes this.
  9. dmark1867

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    I think this might work for sunrise/sunset shots.
    I know the drone is only in the air for 10-20 minutes but still during this short window the light can change a decent amount during sunrise/sunset and it seems adjusting it manually would be more noticeable. So say I am shooting at 60fps and I want shutter speed to be 120, I would then figure out what ND filter gets me there with exposure being where it needs to be, then switch over to auto and at least the shutter speed will be slowed down