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Using Acetone on DJI shell

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Discussion' started by timtown, Jan 2, 2015.

  1. timtown

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    In my exasperating journey to paint my V2+, I've learned a few things that I wish to share.

    So far, I have purchased 3 clam shell replacements. In preparing my 1st top (I used the top of the original DJI V2+), I used rustoleum blue gloss and w/o explanation decided to apply a Krylon satin clear coat. That was my first mistake. Krylon (a lacquer) is incompatible with the rustoleum and wrinkled in spots. I was told it was a simple matter of not letting the blue gloss cure. So I sanded down the wrinkled spots and waited 3 days for it to cure. Tried again, and after speaking to various experts, they told me I needed to wait for 4 days. Once again I sanded it down, and then, waited 10 days. A Kelly-Moore guy told me to use a primer. I used a rustoleum white primer. Dried 3 days. Again painted the blue gloss (no satin). Success.

    I then decided that I wanted to paint the bottom half. I didn't want to dismantle the electronics (yet) so I bought a new clam set. I painted it with the primer and waited 3 days. I then applied Krylon chrome. It wrinkled immediately, but for some reason I painted the remainder of the plane noting that the wrinkling was localized to a few spots. Well, the plane turned into a complete mess, because the Krylon chrome is incompatible with (any) Rustoleum primer. So after speaking to Krylon they suggested I use Acetone to remove the chrome lacquer. I started slowly with a brush and then progressed to using a tub (to contain the splatter). I was happy that both the primer and the chrome seemed to dissolve. BUT, on close inspection I noticed some very fine cracks in the plastic (none appeared to be completely through the plastic. So I continued cleaning with a brush and then with a rag, and then, I noticed the plane was coming apart!

    Supposedly this was an original DJI part, but I suspect a copy with inferior plastic. OR, there is something I don't understand about the use of acetone.

    So now, I have ordered two more clam shells from different sources. Who knows what I will receive. In the mean time, I have a plastic tool drawer that I'm using (again) to test paints in the process of drying.

    My ignorance about painting plastic is showing, but I tell this tale to help others who might make the same mistakes.

    Tim
     
  2. dbfletcher

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    Im not sure if the Shell's are made of ABS.. but acetone is a very good solvent for dissolving abs plastic... we use it to clean 3d printer nozzles all the time.
     
  3. Geoelectro

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    The shell plastic is very sensitive to chemicals. I got some three lock on mine and it started cracking all over. Had to replace it. Perhaps using stickers and wraps is easier.

    Geo
     
  4. PetePerrim

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    Watch this video. Although I used fluorescent paints there are a wide range of regular colours in the Tamiya paint range. It MUST be polypropylene compatible paint. You can thank me later!

    http://youtu.be/fbYsrDCDan8
     
  5. N017RW

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    When dealing with plastics you should always test [chemicals] in an inconspicuous area or location.

    Many instruction labels will say this.
     
  6. timtown

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    As a correction to my previous post, DO NOT use Acetone on polypropylene. It will crack the surface. My shell simply broke apart after sitting in place for a while.
     
  7. Ivan

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    How about Isopropyl alcohol? I used it yesterday to remove glue residue below the stickers on front arms... Am I doomed?! :shock:
     
  8. ToThePoint

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    I suspect the shell is either PS ( polystyrene ) or ABS.
    The only chemicals you can use are the non aggressive kind like alcohol or white-spirit kinda stuff.
    So Ivan your isopropyl does work, doesn't do any damage, i have the same stuff here but i use white-spirit to clean the glue residue.
     
  9. Marlin009

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    WD-40 is excellent for removing glue residue. I don't believe it will harm the plastic.
     
  10. general01

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    What can be used to remove pine rosin?

    I had a run in with a line tree with my p2v(non plus) back of this and it has spots on it(it was a wild crash where the quad summersaulted and landed on its top)

    Trying to not fly close to trees with my p2v+ for that very reasion

    Btw the phantom's shell is abs plastic and is pretty tough in a crash not so when certain things(eg chemicals) get on it the manual says to avoid them when cleaning the shell
     
  11. deltamike

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    I have used acetone with melted white ABS sticks on a Phantom FC40 shell. There was a hole from a previous owner where he drilled a 6 mm hole for some reason or another. I put masking tape over the hole and smeared the melted ABS mixture over it on the inside. After 24 hours I removed the tape and gently wet and dry sanded it and then used t-Cut to smooth it off. That was 3 months ago and its still sound and adhering well.