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US poll on drones

Discussion in 'News' started by Meta4, Dec 20, 2014.

  1. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    The huge degree of ignorance is a big obstacle to acceptance of drones in the USA.
    How is it that in such an otherwise technologically leading country , the majority of the population are completely ignorant and fearful of drones? It seems to be a particularly USA specific issue.

    from SUAS News
    http://www.suasnews.com/2014/12/33443/a ... ety-risks/
     
  2. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    Every poll I've seen reinforces one undeniable truth: people are stupid. It's not just an American thing. People are stupid the world over.
     
    deltamike likes this.
  3. CallMeAlan

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    My feeling is that use of the word 'drones' causes a great deal of negative feeling. I don't think we fly drones, I think we fly UAVs, quadcopters, hexacopters, octocopters, anything but drones. The word 'drones' conveys a militaristic remote weaponry and spying flavour, which ordinary people are quite uneasy about. I blame Parrot for calling their ridiculous AR thing a drone, because that's where it all started.

    I have a Phantom and an F550. I don't have any drones.
     
  4. Prylar Bek

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    Totally agree. I Call mine a chopper (sorry I'm old, Vietnam era)
     
  5. sdtrojan

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    I call mine a death-from-above, hide-your-naked-butt drone.

    There is so little to fear from these things, let's face it. Anything with any real range or payload capacity is going to be a several thousand dollar investment. Nobody who throws that kind of $$$ into a hobby is going to want to see their new toy fly away or risk losing it to a pissed off neighbor with either a major-league caliber arm or quick, ninja-like moves with a broom. A lot of us have spent a good deal of money to get our "flying machines" set up for either our personal enjoyment or business. Folks need to understand we aren't out to get them, just to have some fun in the air.
     
  6. oliver

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    Can't agree more. I was flying one of my smaller quads out front one afternoon when a neighbor asked if it was a "drone". I said I prefer to call it a quadcopter as the word "drone" leads folks to think of Predator military AUV's. He agreed.
    Our local police and fire depts. are looking at quads for special duty but being in the San Francisco Bay area, several groups are very much opposed to their use. The hope is that their benefit will out way the bad press they've received.
    It's hard to convince people that they're not used as spy vehicles violating 4th Amendment rights or armed to the teeth to take out people but are used by peaceful folks to do AP/AV or are just fun to fly like any model aircraft. They can also be life saving tools in search and rescue, searching a hazmat area, looking for an armed suspects, etc.
    There's got to be a better way to educate the general public!!
    My 2 cents worth...............
     
  7. SteveMann

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    I spent some time in a business meetup recently, and I was describing all the good things about small UAV's, etc., etc., and my audience was really somewhere else. Until I stopped saying UAV or Quadcopter and said "small Drone". They awoke and them took an interest in the topic. You can call them anything you like. You can call them AUVs, you can call them quadcopters, you can call them a vehicle with counterrotating pairs of in-plane propellers stabilized by an IMU. You can call them Kolibri.

    The general public only knows "drones". You will never change that.
     
  8. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    I'm amazed that there is any confusion between our toys and military drones.
    The predator and reaper drones have a 50-60 ft wingspan and stay aloft for 24 hours and we fly a bit of plastic you hold in one hand but to a chunk of the US population - they are as good as the same. At the recent LA drone expo, a loony protest group tried to disrupt proceedings because they can't tell the difference. At a San Francisco meeting of business leaders recently given a demo of the Inspire by Eric Cheng of DJI, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMBpSY5 ... e=youtu.be
    After showing the Inspire flying and talking about it for half an hour, Eric is having to field questions from people that still think it is virtually the same as a military drone.
     
  9. PsychopathRC

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    One problem with folks who don't like others using the word 'drone' is that it's the only word that the majority of people recognise. If people ask me what I'm flying and I say a quadcopter. They are baffled. Or they say 'A helicopter?' Then I need to explain the difference. If I say I'm flying a drone, they instantly say 'Oh wow! That's cool!'

    It seems British folks are more open to drone usage then American folks!
     
  10. photographix

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    This ran in our local paper today, and I call BS.

    AP didn't describe the cross-section of the people surveyed. Reputable surveys report how many people were surveyed, and how many were in the survey pool. Good surveys report things like "1063 people were contacted by telephone and were asked the following questions. The pool of those surveyed were from registered voters" or some such source. Then they go on to list the actual wording of the questions with breakdowns by percentage of the responses.

    The article doesn't mention any of this. What was the size of AP's survey pool? Was it their coworkers and friends they met at the company holiday party? Seven neighbors at a barbecue? Three random people they met in the elevator on the way to work in the morning? What was the wording of the questions that were asked? Polling experts will tell you that the wording of the survey can influence, and even greatly bias, the answers of those surveyed.

    As an example, if you have a survey size of 3, and you ask them if drones should be illegal, and 2 of the 3 say "yes", then -- BOOM! -- you magically have an overwhelming majority of 67% of those surveyed advocating a drone ban.

    Here's a quote from the article:

    "But — Amazon take note — only 1 in 4 thinks using drones to deliver small packages is a good idea. Thirty-nine percent were opposed, and 34 percent were neutral on that question. Nearly the same share opposed using drones to take photographs or videos at weddings and other private events. A third opposed allowing farmers to use drones to spray crops, while another third supported it. Only 23 percent said they favored the recreational use of small drones."

    After I read it, all I could think of was that the group of people they surveyed only equate drones with war, guns and missiles, know nothing about wedding photography, virtually nothing about where their food comes from nor how hard it is to run a profitable farming operation, or about RC aircraft or commercial flying at all.

    To me, the way the article reads is more of a reflection on the biases of the reporters writing the story rather than on the results of the mysterious survey they conducted.

    This is, pure and simple, the sloppiest of sloppy journalism. In fact, it's a stretch to even call it journalism. How about some more details about your survey, Associated Press? Please?
     
  11. Meta4

    Meta4 Moderator
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    The SUAS item had this toward the end ...
    The poll of 1,010 adults was conducted online Dec. 4-8, using a sample drawn from GfK’s probability-based KnowledgePanel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points.
     
  12. houldsworth1

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  13. Happyflyer

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    You hit the nail on the head. The stupid voters keep putting the dysfunctional politicians back into office time and time again!
     
  14. fastsmiles

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    I think it would of great benefit if there was a catchy buzz word for quadcopters that could replace the "drone" word.
     
  15. Iron Man

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    I'm sure our "drones" will gain acceptance once they start delivering cheeseburgers. :p