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Underground Power Line in my Backyard

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Alex_, Jul 13, 2015.

  1. Alex_

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    I just placed an order for my P3A and I'm wondering if the underground power line in my backyard is going to be an issue for me. My house backs up to open space so I typically fly my RC planes and Quads right out over my back fence. My hope is to do the same with the P3.

    My concern is that I believe there is a power line buried along the fence line. I know there is cable (Comcast) for sure, but I think power is there as well (come to think of it, there is a power transformer box in the far corner of the property behind some trees). The line serves my neighbor's home I believe so it's 110 or 220v, but there must be higher power running in the adjacent street going into the box, right?

    Is this going to be an issue for me to fly? Or does it just mean I need to go out into the field a ways to calibrate the compass and then come back and fly form the yard? What is the best way to know for sure without crashing if I'm wrong?

    Also, how much space do I need for RTH to be reliable? My yard is wide but not that deep. I have a half basketball court in the yard with trees around it, is that enough space for RTH to reliably land? I'm hoping I don't have to walk way out into the field every time I want to fly. It would be ideal to be able to launch right from my yard and fly the open space.

    Thanks,

    Alex
     
  2. Fplvert

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    Hi Alex, welcome to the forum!

    You should not have any problems with underground power affecting your P3.

    As far as RTH, generally the Phantom will land within 10 feet of its home location. One thing to remember, you can always take back control by pushing the RTH button again. Also, unless you lose signal, there's no need to use RTH as a flight method.

    As an experienced flyer, you will be amazed how easy it is to control your new Phantom. Good luck, and stay away from those trees.
     
    ctp likes this.
  3. Recce2

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    As Fplvert indicated. You will not have a problem.
     
  4. Alex_

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    That's great news! I'm so excited to get it. I've flown RC for years and actually bought a Phantom 2 for one of my employees last year to use for 3D terrain capture (I work for a design software company). I had a chance to fly it in Charleston and was blown away with the eas of flying with GPS assistance. I can't wait to add FPV onto that experience.

    Should I go away from the power box and buried line for compass calibration?
     
  5. Volantis

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    I have a buried power line, too, and it runs nearly directly beneath where I take off and land. It has not been a problem at all. The real problem with power lines is in the wires, themselves, and transformers. If you get within a foot or closer, you could cause the motors to burn out due to induction, but even that is doubtful.

    The worst thing anybody could do near power lines is to fly with a wire dangling below the drone. If the wire spans across more than one wire, depending on what the wires are for, it could cause a major issue with the power company and the safety of people near it. It would definitely be the end of the drone.

    This is such a serious and potential danger to people's safety, that I am annoyed there are no warnings included with the drone purchase to warn about this. It is only a matter of time before someone tries to use their drone as an antenna support and causes trouble for the rest of us.
     
  6. Alex_

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    Great to hear. With all the discussion about compass calibration and issues I've been concerned that my perfect flying area was going to be troublesome. The bird should come later this week, but since it's a bday present from my wife and kids I don't get to open it for 2 weeks, it's gonna be rough!
     
  7. envisionabove

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    Tim in San Diego

    Yes.... go out in a clear area with nothing that could mess up the calibration, you should be good to go. When you take off for the first time always hover about 5 to 6 feet up and watch the bird for any weird movements then fly.