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  1. Rapfife

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    Hi All,
    I'm looking into using the "TrackR Bravo" locator for my PR just in case i get a flyaway. it uses low power bluetoooth and only has a range of about 100 feet, but that could still be a big help in trying to locate an errant drone.
    Any one have any experience with these or similar trackers? I know some use a wifi signal that might cause problems. Any issues i should be aware of before sticking this on my P4?
     
  2. joet

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    Low power BT *shouldn't* be a significant source of interference - especially if you are using 5.8Ghz - but prudence would call for mounting it as far away from the main body (say on the lower landing strut) and testing, testing, testing before flying (or, at least, flying more than a hover test at first).

    The real question: In a real fly-away situation, how will you know which 100' to get close to?

    I am considering a combination of a Trackimo and a Tile - the Trackimo to get close enough and the Tile to home in the last few hundred feet. I have to test it all... But it seems possible.
     
  3. Rapfife

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    The real question is a good question. I'm hoping that if it occurs that I will either have a line of sight in the general direction of the flyaway or maybe the map display can help put me in the general area.

    I could be wrong, but it was my understanding that the antennas were located in the landing struts. I thought of sticking it right on top with two sided tape.
     
  4. joet

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    I thought they were in the vertical supports... Anyone know for sure?

    On top of the unit is the GPS... I'm not putting ANYTHING on top, I don't care how small.
     
  5. Rapfife

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    Ah! Good point.
     
  6. Sky Architect

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    The radio antenna is in fact in the vertical supports for landing gear.

    I use a trackimo on my p4, but only when I'm taking it out and pushing the range.
    Mine is mounted on the underbody on the side and it is so light thay it hasnt affected any performance with my P4. It still hovers in place quite well and is out of the way fpr vps to still work.
    I have a range booster so occasionally this is quite enjoyable for me to explore.

    I however can't speak to the trackimo's accuracy because I've never had to actually track it before. I hope I never do but this brings a good point to me that I do need to test it and prepare for such an occasion.
     
    joet likes this.
  7. jogforfitness

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    With TrackR Bravo, is my understanding correct that you'd have to be within 100 feet to get a signal to find the drone?

    I use Marco Polo. It's sends a radio frequency signal and I attach it to one of my P4 legs with Velcro. It's very light and allegedly can send a signal up to 2 miles.


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots
     
  8. joet

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    I am the opposite - I've got a Trackimo and haven't flown it yet - still conducting tests. If it can see the sky, it is quite accurate. My next tests will involve "what if" scenarios - like, what if it lands on its side (Trackimo down, Phantom body on top)? Will it still get GPS?

    It will track via cell tower triangulation if it can't get GPS - but in my testing, that is absolutely not as accurate.
     
    Sky Architect likes this.
  9. Sky Architect

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    I would love to hear the results of this
     
  10. joet

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    I'll post up the results. The guys in the local flying club want to buy them as well (less concern for them since they have styrofoam fixed wings, mostly).

    What I can say right now is that you can dramatically increase battery life by disabling the reporting interval - you don't need it since you aren't interested in positions until and unless you crash. And - when the unit senses that it is stationary, it apparently stops sending regular positions until you move anyway. I had it in my truck for a few days and that seemed to be the case. The battery lasted well over 3 days before I gave up and decided it was good enough - it was still reporting 65% battery life at that point, although I think it has stages that it reports rather than true percentage.
     
    Sky Architect likes this.