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Took my Phantom 4 to an abandoned steel mill, feedback appreciated!

Discussion in 'Photos and Video' started by Billy Kyle, Sep 25, 2016.

  1. Billy Kyle

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  2. Cobs

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    Very nice flying mate, lovely views there
     
  3. Billy Kyle

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    Thank you!
     
  4. Alex Baxter

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    Amazing, like a decaying mechanical skeleton, great subject matter.
     
    Johnny Bellew likes this.
  5. namnonac

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    Great footage, loved the part flying all the railway tracks.


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots
     
  6. rockydog

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    Great flying, and an interesting subject....Did you have any compass problems flying near all that steel?
     
  7. LeonW

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    Nice flying dude. Did tge obstacle avoidance help? Id surely wrap my p3a around that steel flying so close!

    Sent from my SM-G935F using PhantomPilots mobile app
     
  8. Southern Oklahoma

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    Great video
    Like the train tracks
     
  9. Billy Kyle

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    Agreed!
     
  10. KillerKustums

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  11. Billy Kyle

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    That was my favorite too!
     
  12. Billy Kyle

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    Thank you for the comment!
     
  13. Panzerphantom

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    Beautiful! My mind is racing for the possibilities of all kinds of Steampunk pictures and videos that could be made on such a monster of a building :D
    Great flying too, especially the train tracks part... Wouldn't dream to take my Phantom 3 Standard there with all the interference from that metal, but it seems the Phantom 4 managed just fine?
     
  14. Billy Kyle

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    I had no trouble at all, maybe because of the upgraded hardware
     
  15. lynxpilot

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    Nice vid. Really well done!
     
  16. Johnny Bellew

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    That was an awesome video! Being an ol bricklayer, and now a Pipefitter, it was cool to see a drone flight over something I'm somewhat familiar with! A little info on what I recognized in your video... And a very very short explanation at that.

    It appeared there are 4 separate blast furnaces there on that site. Small in comparison to the 3 that I have got to work on, which was total reline jobs of the refractory inside of them, but so so cool to see! The ones I worked on were huge, one being the 2nd largest in the world. A true privilege!

    The tallest vessels are the blast furnaces themselves. That's where the actual melting of the raw iron oar took place. The smaller vessels that surrounded each furnace are stoves which generated the heat it took to melt the iron oar. Amazing how that part works.

    Inside those stoves, and on one side are firebrick called checker brick. Air is forced up through the holes in the checker brick then hitting the domed top and coming down the other side. This friction is enough to get the air very very hot. It then enters the blast furnace, in a blast, igniting coke, which is a baked coal dust, thus melting the iron oar that is dumped in the top of the furnace which gave you raw steel. The stoves take turns providing the heated air.

    What I'm not seeing is the rest of the yard, which must not be there now. It would've been where the raw steel was taken in a melted form to the big pots where the additives like zink was added.

    That plant had to be from very late 1800's or early 1900's. Very old, very cool! I can just see it up and running and all the old timers running it! I just find it amazing the technology they had back then is still used in the same ways today! Today's blast furnaces work just like those did, just more controlled as computers come into play.

    What a cool thing to video! I loved your perspective on the things you brought attention to. The POI you done was what appeared to be a stack off one of the furnaces.

    Great job and keep it up!


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots
     
  17. Johnny Bellew

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    Watched the vid again and the yard that I mentioned very well may still be there, but it was a very fast glimps. Not certain, but very possible.


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots
     
  18. Karl Jordan

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    Loved it. There are old abandoned lead mines near me. You have inspired me to film there. What is the music?
     
  19. Johnny Bellew

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    Is that mill in Bethlehem, Pa. If I may ask? If so, it was built in 1886 and opened in 1890. Could be wrong, trying to research only by way of recognizing pictures.


    Sent from my iPad using PhantomPilots
     
  20. ImperialZenta

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    Nice vid
    I like the run along the tracks at 1:57

    I recommend cutting out that slight nudge at 1:06 when you were lining up the tracks.

    Other than that, nice subject matter and really good pans.