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Solution to eliminate ALL video jello from Sony

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Jessebarrios, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. Jessebarrios

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    Hi, I'm new to the board and just received my Phantom a few days ago. Been doing a lot of research on the product and finally pulled plugged. With a modified mount, I've been using my Sony TX200v camera on the Phantom for 4 different flights with no issues. While the video quality is far better than the GoPro 3, the jello is still bad.

    I did a little more research today and came up with Sony's new Balanced Optical SteadShot (BOSS). There's no way to describe how awesome this seems to work without you guys seeing it for yourself:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjH59K_v6hA (about 33 secs in is where I see the Phantom benefiting :D )

    So my question, how much can the Phantom hold? Here are the weight specs on the Sony HDR-CX430V camera that will be released in March with the BOSS system?

    Weight (Approx.) : Approx.11.3oz ((320g) Main Unit Only); Approx.13.2oz(NP-FV50(supplied battery);Approx.14.8oz(NP-FV70); Approx.1lb2.3oz(NP-FV100)


    Here is the product specs about the camera from Sony:
    http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores ... 7#features


    The camera is expensive but if the Phantom can hold this Sony I believe it's worth it.
     
  2. Gizmo3000

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    Impressive demo!

    hm,. looks like that camera is about twice the weight of the GoPro, so imagine that it could be lifted. (as some people are flying Phantom's with TWO batteries!).

    But regardless of what camera you attach, the real key to eliminating/reducing jello is to balance the props and trying to isolate the camera.
    Combine that with that Sony and you might really get some impressive footage!
     
  3. Jessebarrios

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    I have a prop balancer on the way along with moongel. I'm seriously thinking about pre-ordering the camera to make the setup a complete shake-free setup. If I do I'll be sure to post videos on the site.
     
  4. footlaunch1

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    Hi guys
    I see so many of you have problems with the Jello
    I have fitted the DJI black props and check balanced them and no jello.
    I use the Go Pro mount stuck on the the Phantom and the Go Pro underwater case works great no Jello will post a video soon
     
  5. Adam

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    The Sony Balanced Optical Steady Shot is an incredible system. I always thought it would be too heavy for the Phantom, but I don't have one so I can't test it out. Please, if you get it going post up a video here so we can all check it out.

    Sony has another steady system, called Optical Steady Shot (leave out the balanced!) that they integrate into their smaller cameras, and it seems to work really well. I just picked up a used Sony HX20V and just doing some test videos around the house I can tell it really stabilizes the video.

    Of course, I've been waiting on a new Phantom for about 3 weeks so I haven't been able to test it out. My transmitter had a defect where it was always transmitting a right rudder command to the Phantom, making it impossible to fly for very long without crashing....
     
  6. Jessebarrios

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    I decided to pre-order the Sony HDR-CX430V camera a few days ago along with the 2 year accidental square trade warranty through Amazon :twisted: .

    Like I mentioned, my biggest concern is the weight. The CX430V [13.2oz w/supplied battery (374.2g)] camera weighs a lot more than the Sony RX100 [8.5 oz (240g)], so I know flight times will be shorted dramatically, but I feel pretty confident the Phantom will be able to lift the camera.

    The camera doesn't ship out till March 11th, shorty after that I will post video test of the camera's performance with and without the DJI Phantom. It shoot's 1080P /60 fps, better than my 5D Mark III...but in terms of video quality, we'll find out.
     
  7. sturejo@online.no

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    I've seen many referals to MoonGel as a means to reduce jello. Anyone have pictures of how to use the gel with the standard gopro-mount?
    When balancing the props - is pieces of tape - or sandpaper the best way?
    -stu
    Norway
     
  8. pwright

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    I used sandpaper as was shown in many of the videos you'll find on YouTube. Combination of 220 and 400 grit.
     
  9. Gizmo3000

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    From what I've seen,. users have merely sandwiched the gel between the mount and the phantom body, and then screwed it in.
    not very elegant, but apparently it helps. They also place moongel around the GoPro inside the housing/frame. Guess the whole idea is to keep the GoPro as isolated from the body as possible.
    Scroll down on this page and you'll see some examples .
    http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthre ... 432&page=3

    all methods of balancing a prop appear to be acceptable from what I've seen (in youtube video).
    some use tape, others sand,.and others use CA glue (along with sanding) to balance.
    I've used tape, and have gotten fine results
    but I'll probably try sanding next.
    I've also seen some videos where they discuss balancing the prop hub as well, which can only be done with sanding and/or adding glue.
     
  10. BigDog

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    Just found this link in case anyone wants to create their own isolation mount. They sell many varieties of Sorbothane products, including mounts with various configurations of male/female studs/posts.

    http://www.isolateit.com/mounts-vibrati ... mpers.html

    Hope this helps.
     
  11. MRSpyder2U

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    Location:
    Rome, Georgia y'all
    Greetings to everyone and thank you for such an outstanding forum. I've read all of the posts and found some great advice and tips. There's an incredible amount of experience and information to be found here.
    I thought I might be able to add another dimension to the discussion of prop balancing. I've been flying RC planes for a few years and all of it electric. One of the most important things that can be done for any prop driven machine, outside of proper CG, is to make sure the prop is balanced. An out-of-balance prop can cause premature wear to the motor bearings causing them to overheat and seize, send vibrations through the airframe and loosen parts, and can even cause the prop to fail and fly apart. Not to mention that vibration is second only to heat for causing electronic components to fail. And now I've learned that it can make Jell-o out of a video.
    Having "droned" (pun intended) on about that, I'd like to offer yet another way to balance props. I shy away from sanding the blades because this can induce subtle changes to the shape of the prop and lessen its efficiency. Instead, I apply the lightest of coatings of clear, spray-on polyurethane to both sides of the "light" blade. I then hold it in front of a fan to speed the drying time. (The lower the humidity the better.) Then put it on the balancer. I repeat the procedure until the prop is balanced. This will maintain the intended shape of the prop without removing any of the surface area. I haven't had a vibration induced failure yet with this procedure.
    Thanks for letting me prattle on, and fair skys and light breezes to you.

    Addendum: I just finished balancing the props and they were W-A-Y out of balance. It took 5-7 coats of polyurethane to get them balanced! If these props are any indication of all the rest that are out there, then you seriously need to balance your props if you haven't already. It may be contributing to some of the mysterious calibration problems people are having. Please, if you haven't balanced the props, don't fly again until you do.