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Soldering the Gimbal.

Discussion in 'Zenmuse H3-2D GoPro Gimbal' started by frankieplus, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. frankieplus

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    I'm hearing some not so good reports about the main circuit board in the Phantom having those extra high heat solder joints and in another forum someone has melted the circuit board trying to remove the solder from the ESC's.

    So since I need to install a Zenmuse Gimbal. I was wondering that rather than soldering the PMU direct to the solder point that DJI recommend in their 'How to' Gimbal videos.

    Is it wiser to cut the power cable and maybe make a manual Y connection so that I'm soldering the wires rather than the joints on the circuit board?


    -Frank
     
  2. Siddy

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    I used an electric iron which you can hit it with heat like gas iron. 1st joint was ok but the send which goes to the battery was popping off when adding another cable. If your now up on soldering I'd cut the cable and used a small terminal strip, tin the wires first.
     
  3. Audaciter

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    No need. The more connections you have, the less reliable your overall system will be. DJI did indeed use good high temp
    solder, but there is no need to remove it. They used enough, that you can melt it, and add your Zenmuse module, and PMU V2
    to either the Main Board , or the ESC's.

    If you don't have a good soldering iron, then you may want to pick one up.
     
  4. frankieplus

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    I have a good Weller solder station, the WESD51., Goes from 350-850F. But that's the range for low temperature normal solder.

    Since the Phantom has those high temp solder joints do I need a new higher temperature soldering iron to be able to melt the solder? There are specific high temp soldering stations but they are expensive I think.

    How are the rest of you managing to solder on to the phantom board, are you all using high temperature irons and high temp solder???

    -Frank

    -Frank
     
  5. boat chaser

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    my soldering iron only gets to 600 and I had no problems at all.
     
  6. Audaciter

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    You will be fine with the work station you have. I was using a cheap 25w Weller for a while, and it was okay, but too
    inconsistent. I had to upgrade to the Binford 3000. :mrgreen:
     
  7. deluge2

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    I have the same solder station. Temp range is not a problem, you might want to pick up a soldering iron tip that is larger than the default supplied by Weller. There are lots of options, but I got the largest chisel tip Weller makes (tip model ETDD). This increases the 'thermal mass' held at the set temperature and available to transfer quickly to the solder joint. I suggest getting Weller-branded tips, they have the temp sensor integrated into the tip. See for example (http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/weller/tips/ettips.htm).

    Steve
     
  8. frankieplus

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    Thanks everyone for your responses...

    Just for info - With lead free high temperature solder - Does anyone know what temperature the iron is suppose to be at to melt it?

    Do 'high temperature' soldering irons/stations exist primarily for use with high temperature solder? Or is it just the same irons that have always been available...


    -Frank
     
  9. Audaciter

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    As far as i know, they are the same, because some solder joints have to be pretty big, and it takes a much greater amount of
    heat transfer.