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Research Catapult Tests Danger of Drones

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RedHotPoker, May 26, 2016.

  1. RedHotPoker

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    Hahaha!? Ah You didn't think I was going to jam a carbon fiber rotor blade into my own face, EH!?!?
    How much damage can a tiny drone propeller really do when it comes up agains something as solid as a person? That’s the question Aalborg University in Denmark is answering with a rig that can ram a spinning drone propeller into a piece of flesh at 33mph… and record the results in slow motion.

    The video is an accurate (if slightly gruesome) demonstration of what could happen if you lose control of your drone and it hits a person, propeller spinning. And if you’re like us, it’ll have you extra careful the next time you pilot that DJI of yours.

    In the video below, the 10-foot long rig fires a spinning drone propeller at a piece of raw pork roast, capturing the resulting collision at up to 3,000 frames per second so they can analyze how the propeller behaves when it hits flesh, and the extent of the damage it can do.

    The results will hopefully help engineers develop future propellers that break apart more easily and do less damage if they do somehow make contact with an unsuspecting human.

    RESEARCH CATAPULT TESTS THE DANGERS OF DRONES

    show-news
    At Aalborg University’s Drone Research Lab, a new experimental setup with a motorized catapult and high-speed camera now documents in detail what happens when one of the popular small hobby drones hit objects or people. In the first film from the lab, drones are sent on a collision course with a pork roast.
    image.jpeg
    Last modified: 13.04.2016

    - The objective is to examine the consequences when different kinds of drones hit people, animals, cars, glass panes and other obstacles they may encounter in their path. With a high-speed camera and precise measurements of both the speed and the force of the collision, it is possible to assess the damage that may occur, says Anders la Cour-Harbo, director of the drone lab.


    The catapult was built by the university specifically for this type of experiment and it is still in the testing phase. The videos show the very first experiments for adjusting the mechanics and electronics of the catapult. In addition, researchers are still working on optimizing the light and camera setup, so registration will be as good as possible.

    - The first attempts are interesting because they clearly show what could happen when a regular hobby drone hits a human being. But it’s too early to conclude anything, emphasizes Anders la Cour-Harbo. Particularly in the tests simulating collisions with people, it is necessary to do it absolutely right and verify that the results are reliable. The university is thus working with Aalborg University Hospital to conduct experiments that can help us better understand how dangerous drones really are.

    The actual catapult is nearly three meters long and built of aluminum. The slide is pulled by an electric motor. It can accelerate a 1-kilogram drone up to 15 meters per second and the collision is filmed with a high-speed camera with over 3000 frames per second. The force of impact is measured over time as this is important for the extent of the injury. Once the researchers get more experienced, the plan is to upgrade the catapult for larger drones and higher speeds.

    Other videos from the tests are on the Drone Impacts research project YouTube channel. Download screenshot.

    Further information
    Catch as catch can? Not I Sir... Nahhh!!

    RedHotPoker
     
    #1 RedHotPoker, May 26, 2016
    Last edited: May 26, 2016
  2. Ramphex

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    I don't like the test. Please fly a drone into a piece of pork for proper testing purposes. The difference between object in the air and an object on the track is that the object in the air doesn't have as much resistance and would probably bounce off before furiously penetrating you with a blade.
     
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  3. RedHotPoker

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    I think thee test result, was pretty clear and evident. Will you please kindly volunteer, your flesh? Not me, thanks...
    Hard to say for sure. But if the drone was crash landing, or in "Sport Mode" the natural forces much like gravity, will propel that drone, like a stone.
    Rather be safe than have an eyeball shish-kabob...
    I have seen some major wounds from an average sized RC hobby model. + Our skin is very weak, compared to that pig hide.


    RedHotPoker