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Question about shutter speeds in relation to frame rate...

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Cerone, Sep 23, 2015.

  1. Cerone

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    I understand the general rule of thumb is to use a shutter that is the inverse double of your frame rate. For instance, if my frame rate is 30fps I should use a shutter of 1/60s.

    My question this:
    If I need more or less light for proper exposure, am I better off shooting as close to 1/60s as possible or should I always work in multiples of two of my frame rate? (Example: should I use 1/50s since its closest to 1/60s or should I use 1/30s since its a multiple of 30?

    I understand that I could adjust ISO but in most cases I prefer to leave it at 100 or 200 to minimize noise/grain.

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Mordor

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    Sorry to ask, is it for shoot at night?

    Tks
     
  3. Viral

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    No. You don't h e to use multiples of 2. It's better to keep it closer to 2x. In other words. Moving from 1/60 to 1/50 would be better than 1/30. Keep in mind that the shutter speed is how much motion blur you are introducing to each individual frame.
     
  4. Southerndude Kolenda

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    Also, If your not shooting something in motion, or talking heads, and mostly static landscapes, then the shutter speed is not as critical, and you would have more latitude Example:Your shooting a landscape that is completely static, no wind, or moving water, if the frame rate was 60fps, it would be fine to adjust the shutter speed to say, 1-stop Over/Under of the 120th that would be the normal choice. Now you could also do the opposite, Let's say you wanted to shoot some waterfalls, Then you could even shoot at a slower shutter speed to add more motion blur to the moving water. Having a set of ND filters really helps with getting the kind of creative exposure one desires. In the case of real fast action, a faster shutter speed might be better, it's a trial and error experience. Hope this helps.
     
  5. Cerone

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    I mostly shoot sunrise & sunset, as well as daylight with an ND16.

    Thanks!

    Thank you!
     
    Mordor likes this.