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Prospective Noob...

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Tricky, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. Tricky

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    I am sure this has been broached ad nauseam, but please bare with me. As I prepare to invest in this new hobby, which really seems exciting to me...as technology emerges to make this more attainable for enthusiasts to be able to enjoy somewhat easily, would any forum members here suggest that maybe I spend $60 on a Hubsan X4 first...to give flying a try first, maybe work on my skillset, before jumping on the P3P? I plan to purchase the P3P in late August, after I make my mortgage payment :)

    But in all honesty, will I gain valuable skills with the 1/25th less expesive X4...in preparation for the P3P?

    Many thanks all, I have already learned a ton here on this forum in two days of reading....
     
  2. phantom3menace

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    I had some similar to a Hubsan and I actually think it was harder to fly than my P3P which as most people know are pretty easy to fly.
     
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  3. Fplvert

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    Welcome to the Forum, Tricky.

    If you have no prior experience with RC airplanes or helicopters I would recommend getting a small quad like you mentioned. It will give you more confidence and practice on the sticks.

    The Phantoms are easy to fly, but learning the sticks and orientation takes practice. Good luck with your new bird(s).
     
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  4. King Luff

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    Hi. I'm in a similar position to yourself however i have had a Hubsan X4 since Christmas and i'm just about to pull the trigger on my 1st "proper" flying machine. The hubsan will teach you how to fly manually which i think can only help in the long run as it does not rely on GPS so if anything happened to your very expensive P3 you could switch it to Attitude Mode and gain controll with some confidence.

    The X4 is also very durable, i have had many crashes and even submerged in my garden pond for 10 seconds but the little thing just keeps going!
     
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  5. dedstik

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    Tricky...

    You are asking the right question.

    I started with the Hubsan when they were first available.

    Yes, you can make the point that the micro quads are more difficult to fly. This being said you can't really fly a 450 sized quad in your living room either (!)

    If you have no RC gear now, the Hubsan is a good starting point (get extra batteries and the small multi battery charging hub). Don't bother with the camera equipped version...too heavy and reduced flight times. Get this one from the Banggood US warehouse for $43.00:

    http://www.banggood.com/New-Version...n=Rc-Quad-us&gclid=CKrZ-s6lg8cCFc5lfgodKTMFPg

    If you already have a Spektrum brand transmitter then I would recommend the Blade nano QX, only because your LHS will have spare props and bodies and all the stuff you'll trash learning to flip the little guy. Don't get the 3D version.

    There is a lot of multirotor activity where I fly my P3. I regularly see new pilots put their new larger RTF quads into trees and parking lots. It's easy to get disorientated when your new quad flies behind you and you struggle with controlling it. Thump...doh !

    Get the Hubsan, extra batteries and props and fly it. Order you P3 if you see a deal, but leave it in the box until you've beaten up the Hubsan.

    :harry
     
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  6. Tricky

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    Exactly why I signed up to this forum, thanks all!! I'll keep you posted. Appreciate all the help here and in the future :)
     
  7. King Luff

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    I went from a hubsan to a dromida ominus, i'd also highly recommend them for learning but despite it being marketed as tough to break i have manged to break both of mine with very minor crashes. Best thing i have learn't from owning them both however is orientation at long distances and basic soldering.
     
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  8. Buckaye

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    Yeah orientation is key and it's great to learn on something less forgiving because it will make you more comfortable with the Phantom. I learned on CP heli's so coming over to a phantom was like going from B&W to high def!
     
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  9. ctfireman

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    Smart move. I went backwards & bought a P3 with zero rc experience. A friend then advised me to park it & buy & fly a syma x5c-1 to see what real flying was like. The full manual skills are a must have & take some time to build. At the same time, don't get over comfortable with the stability GPS flight gives you. Always stay ready. Good luck & happy flying!
     
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  10. PaulMuns

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    I purchased a micro with a controller before my P3 arrived. The **** thing was so difficult to fly I came close to cancelling my P3 order. P3 came in and it is super easy to fly. Keep it in beginner mode and learn in an open area. My early mistake was watching exclusively the P3 flying and not the screen on the tablet. It is hard to judge perspective at a distance and it caused me to bump into a brick building. Prop guards saved me from any damage. Once you get the basics, learn to fly manual. Landings are much easier than I thought that they would be. Just take it down slow. I previously had no RC or flight experience.
     
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  11. SirAchie

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    Yes without a doubt, the statement easy to fly is true but there is a hell of alot of info to read/learn. Buy a Hubson and learn to fly box's, great for getting your orientation

    Sirachie P3A
     
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  12. Ed.south

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    Jump in its easy to fly
     
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  13. RoyVa

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    One thing you will probably find out. Flying LOS yor distance perspective will be off. The quad gets closer to things than it looks like. I have trimmed a couple sets of props on poles and fences by thinking I was still a couple of feet away. Distance perception is off when the quad is a ways away from you.
     
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  14. MattyDread

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    20150809_192341.jpg
    I tried to chop down a tree today - tree won. Quad all good, fell about 4metres into long soft grass. Lucky
     
  15. xave

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    I also started with a Hubson and found it to be a great test of skill. I highly recommend starting out that way to learn the fundamentals as others in this thread have mentioned. As you may have already read in other posts there may be times where you will have to switch to "atti" mode and fly manually without the assistance of gps, vps, or at times loss of video signal. Times like this you will be happy you have the skill to bring your bird home. Good luck and we look forward to seeing more posts from you in the future.
     
  16. RoyVa

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    I thank goodness every day for GPS and the Failsafe as well as H/l. For some reason every couple of days while flying LOS I lose her in the sky. If it wasn't for the built in functions I would have lost her many time over. Thank goodness for the RTH function. Makes no difference where is practice with the hand held quad or not. Flying with the Phantom is different and just like the ocean that a big sky up their with a little dot in it. Failsafe Rocks!
     
  17. Mike Gravo

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    I probably had this for over a year before the P3 came out.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096SJU3U/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_QNgYvb02YRF1K

    Controls are the same, $30. Buy extra batteries. Works indoors and outdoors. Crashed a few times, destroyed one, bought another. Like someone else stated, don't waste money on a small drone with a camera (Syma X5-C for example) if you just want to learn the controls. Santa brought me and X5-C last year, but I found the X1 to be more fun, and looking at the X5-C footage to be a waste of time. Good luck.
     
  18. TeddyXanzibar

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    I had no experience with any RC toy ever prior to purchasing my P3P. I just took it to nice open areas to get the hang of it (with no screen at the time). There is definitely a learning curve but you just have to appreciate it and take it easy. I have a strong feeling video games really helped me pick up the controls quickly. Be gentle and enjoy it until you get comfortable.