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Post crash camera issue

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision + Help' started by ryanhoelzer, Apr 21, 2015.

  1. ryanhoelzer

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    My boss crashed one of our P2V+s, I changed the shell and one of the ESCs and it's flying fine. They camera is correct 90% of the time, but if I rock it side to side enough the gimbal can't keep up. It's not doing the dance and it's level most of the time but sometimes it's off. I've updated everything and done an advanced IMU calibration. Has anyone seen this? Any solutions?


     
  2. 4wd

    4wd

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    Location:
    North York Moors
    Is FPV mode checked in the app?
    You don't want that checked for rock steady camera.
     
  3. ryanhoelzer

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    You obviously didn't watch the video..
     
  4. jiminyfixit

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    Have you checked if the "roll" motor wiggles in its bracket? Be careful not to separate them, but if you do, be gentle so as not to rip the ribbon cable. If that connection wiggles, the only way to correct your camera problem, is to disassemble the camera and secure the motor to the bracket. Having been a machinist, I have found a great way to fix this. I repair these fussy buggers all the time and loose roll motors are the primary problem.
    I start from the camera module on up, when removing the ribbon cable. Remove 4 screws on back cover plate, CAREFULLY flip the ribbon lock up to release the ribbon. Unwind the ribbon around the module to gain access to the shaft screw. Remove screw and slide module off shaft. Remove all 4 screws that hold the "pitch" motor to its bracket. Carefully flip ribbon locks up, on pitch circuit board, remove ribbons from each connector; one from the motor itself and very slowly and carefully peel the ribbon from the gimbal parts. Take it slow so as not to rip the ribbon. Remove the back plate from the "roll" motor circuit board and flip the locks up and remove the ribbons in the same manner as the pitch circuit board. Remove the 3 screws that hold the roll motor to the bracket. You now have the roll motor and its bracket in your hand, I hope. Wiggle the motor. If it is loose, pull on it and separate it from the bracket. You will see a black ring inside the bracket. It is a composite magnetic material. Check it for gouges, scrapes or missing pieces. If it has a few scratches it will still function. Check the hole in the bracket where the short motor shaft goes, to see if it is oblonged from the crash. If it is, rest the back of the bracket on a flat metal surface, (I have a small machinists vice with a fairly wide surface). I put one layer of blue masking tape on that surface to keep from scratching the aluminum. I use a 3/8" diameter flat punch and squarely re-flatten the oblonged top surface of the small hole by tapping on it with the hammer. Now, here is the secret. Find a 3/16 diameter ball bearing. Rest it on top of the hole, take the 3/8" punch and set it squarely on top of the ball bearing and hit it fairly sharply. Turn the bracket over and place it on top of a 3/8 nut. This size nut fits nicely inside the bracket without interfering with anything and gives the bracket the support it needs when you hit the ball bearing. It avoids "caving" in the bracket slightly. This procedure "closes" the hole a bit at both ends, Now, turn the bracket over with the ring showing and place the motor with the small, short shaft down into the hole. With the circuit board side of the bracket facing your right, place the motor into the bracket with the "flat" UP, (at 90 degrees). Take a small hammer and tap on the larger shaft, (the one with the "flat" on it), enough to slightly seat the motor into the bracket. Check to be sure everything is "square" and even relative to the bracket and proceed to give it a few more taps. Check again and finish tapping until the shaft bottoms out, flush with the back of the bracket. The motor should now be quite tight in the bracket. Spin the motor to see if it rotates smoothly. It should rotate with a slight "quiver", which indicates that the motor and madnetic ring are interating as they should. Nice job! Any horizontal gimbal adjustment can be done to position the "flat" on the shaft, after assembly and camera is mounted on quad. Good luck! Feel free to post any further questions.
     
  5. kookjo

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    If you are not a machinist, which chances are you are not, I have found by far the best results for fixing camera and or gimbal issues Go to uavrepairshop.com and talk to Hani. He has repaired four of them for me and all of them have come back like new.