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Point of Site and Tight Quarters

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by propeyes, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. propeyes

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    Now with quite a few 10 hours on the copter, the most I have flow it away from me is maybe 350 feet and 300 feet up in safe air space.

    1) I discovered the cool radar in the app by clicking the compass feature to tell me which direction I'm going which is awesome! But still uneasy about flying that far and not able to see with my human eye which way the copter is facing. The LED's in the day are hard to make out at distance, and I saw some nifty extra LED lights you can add to the first phantom.

    Do you all rely on this radar feature or have you added some day running lights to help with orientation? :geek: Where to get them?

    2) Now I live in the mountains and even flying a dirt road with tree along the side make me very nervous and at distance hard to tell how far away you are from an object as the background blends. So guess just looking for tips on this. I know the obvious answer is practice, but looking for any good tips or tricks on the app. Distance sensors would be the most obvious upgrade. I know if you rely on the video too much you can drift into something pretty quickly.

    Tips and tricks for tight quarters or when you loose point of site? And if you lose camera and point of site, :?: what should be a pilots next course of action. Thanks..
     
  2. OI Photography

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    viewtopic.php?f=7&t=7977
     
  3. propeyes

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    Thanks, I've seen a lot Phantom lights, is wiring on these the same to the Phantom Vision 2?
     
  4. OI Photography

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    You'll have to add connectors and/or do some soldering to get them wired to the on-board power supply on the P2V. Some of the lights have connectors on the ends, but those are either for the balance lead on a regular battery (not like the one on the P2V) or for JST connectors you'd have to add yourself.
     
  5. Pull_Up

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    1) I use the radar a lot. I treat it a bit like the rear view mirror in a car. I don't look at it all the time, but I glance at it frequently enough that I know my orientation all the time if I'm not able to work it out visually.

    2) I haven't done much flying in close quarters at a distance, but from what I have done I know that if you use the FPV then it has a tendency to make things look closer than they actually are (no bad thing). You're right about it being tough to judge by eye how close you are to distant objects, though. I tend to fly visually to the point where I think I'm close enough, then use the app to the point where in that I think I'm close enough. When I've gone to have a look there's usually been a good 6ft of slack. More difficult is seeing how close you are to something to the side of your route. There's nothing specific in the app that I've found that can help with these - as you say it's practice and getting to know where your comfort limits are - and those will be different for everyone.

    b) ;) If you lose visual and camera then you can always take your hands off the sticks and walk over to where it is. Unless you have done some crazy distance mods you should be able to get to it ok. You can use the "Find my Vision" section of the app to home in on it. Quite often if you lose camera you can still get telemetry which means the radar and GPS co-ords will still work. If you know the terrain and obstacles you could force a return to home (bearing in mind the height limits on that) or you could engage home lock if you have IOC enabled and understand how that works (assuming you can climb to a height to clear all obstacles first).
     
  6. themosttoys

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    I use radar exactly as Pull_Up describes, like a rear view mirror. While I don't leave it up all the time it is very handy, especially when it's time to fly home and I'm beyond visual range.

    While I am a fairly experienced pilot, for some reason I can not master close quarters. As long as I'm above everything I do fine. History has taught me to generally keep my altitude higher than the tallest object between me and the Phantom. When control signal is lost, auto RTH will kick in pretty darn quick and could mess up an otherwise happy flight.