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Phantom Vision Interference

Discussion in 'Phantom 2 Vision Discussion' started by mrphotomagic, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. mrphotomagic

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Ireland
    Before I took my new Phantom Vision outside to fly it I decided to test it indoors without the props,
    Mainly because of all the talk about flyaway incidents, This indoor test was very interesting,
    So rather than trying to explain what happened, I decided to make a video and show you,
    I have uploaded it to youtube, Please take a look , I would appreciate some feedback on this from the members of this community.
    I have been flying my Mikrocopter Hexa for about 2 years (without incident, touch wood) so I am used to multi rotor flying,
    But I have to say that this interference is giving me cause for concern.
    My question is - Is this Phantom Vision safe to fly ?
    Obviously I will be testing this in a wide open field, I am just waiting for a break in the weather, I will do a video and upload the results and post it here

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZ6tISthc7M
     
  2. gpauk

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    Location:
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    When you use the tilt sensor button on the app, it controls the gimbal and will yaw the PV, so that button can affect the motors...
    It'll then get a bit confused as the yaw doesn't happen.
    This may be may you are seeing...
     
  3. mrphotomagic

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    gpauk, that's a good point,
     
  4. iDrone

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Los Angeles, California USA
    Agreed, I believe in GYRO mode (pressing & holding GYRO button) the iDevice's TILT position is fed to the gimbal and its compass position (360°) is fed to the Autopilot to apply yaw to match the direction you're moving your iDevice in.

    What's very interesting is PHOTO mode, and if my guess is correct is actually an impressive bit of code written by the designer; I suspect when instructed to snap a photo or series of photos, the Autopilot relinquishes fast GPS positional corrections for a moment and settles the PV to minimize motion blur (same as one would do in ATTI mode - smoother). Come to think of it, of all the photos I've snapped at night, I don't remember a single one being blurry. Based on the streak-less photos, I also suspect the camera control system waits for the moment when the PV's multi-axis gyro sensor reports the aircraft is stable before snapping the photo. Many cameras today are equipped with "anti-shake" or image-stabilization like the iPhone, but to actually feather flight would be a pretty impressive bit of code above & beyond.

    iDrone