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Phantom at 1200m altitude

Discussion in 'Photos and Video' started by xgeek, Mar 19, 2014.

  1. xgeek

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    Was looking for Flytrex videos and came across this. That's some crazy altitude :shock: . Don't think that can be legal in any country.

    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsOx0O35MAs[/youtube]
     
  2. jayhas

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    Wow! Seems to take forever to get it up and another chunk of forever to get it down :shock:
     
  3. xgeek

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    Thats exactly what my girlfriend said to me as well :lol:
     
  4. ladykate

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    Technically, it is not illegal here but the FAA has recommended we stay under 400 feet. As an example, we have large fireworks that go higher than 1600 meters and those would be make a worse mess than a 1-2kg airplane. I have put a 550 up to 600 meters but, other than being able to say I did it, it wasn't really worth it. The winds can be harsh up higher and losing the aircraft is a real possibility. The skies are clear around here (for the most part) but I'm sure some idiot will create an incident in crowded airspace sooner or later.
     
  5. Uncle Meat

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    1600 meters? That's nearly a mile! Very few commercial fireworks get anywhere near 1000ft fyi.

    U.M.
     
  6. ladykate

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    Off topic but I need to explain - although even the simplest aerial display fireworks (professional fireworks) exceed 400':

    You are partially right - the local fire department 4th of July shows only shoot up to 6 inch shells (usually) and those burst somewhere around 600-800 feet (up to double the proclaimed 400 rule') . However, you are also wrong in that many high-end display companies and hobbyist Guilds shoot fireworks that equal or exceed 1200 meters. Google PGI and 24" shells - they burst between 2500 and 2800 feet and can have a 900' - 1200' radius flower. We shoot them at PGI and WPA conventions (Midwest and West) Google Dan Thames or Bruce Steyding - the former has 1.5" rockets (not HPR - Fireworks rockets) that go 5000' plus, the latter has 3" fiberglass display rockets (not HPR) that go as high as 12,000 feet. I say to Google them because they are well known - but others have similar results. We shoot this stuff at regional and national events every year.

    And in a lame attempt to get back on topic, Phantoms have been used since last August to catch some of this stuff on film from the air. However, no one wants to go 1400 meters high (at night) to look down on the burst. :D
     
  7. Uncle Meat

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    Read my reply again. RIF. I said commercial fireworks, I never mentioned high-end display companies and hobbyist Guilds and neither did you. :roll: You're referring to one-off special shells which are not typical in the majority of fireworks displays so your example was poor at best.

    U.M.
     
  8. poostik

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  9. ladykate

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    OK. Don't want to argue the point too much. If there was just one firework that went that high it would prove the point. As it is, there are hundreds throughout the year. I did not say they were or were not commercial in my original post but the fact is, the last one we shot was commercial. You seem to want to dispute something but I'm not sure what it is. We, in the US, shoot fireworks all the time that exceed the 1200 meter height. These are fully licensed and permitted fireworks. What is there to argue about? I won't post any more responses so this doesn't destroy the intent of the OP.
     
  10. F6Rider

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    The main point being that a company planing to shoot off a fireworks display must get a PERMIT to do so, thus alerting the local low flying aircraft to avoid the area at those times. A pilot is not even going to see the Phantom before it splats on his windshield. I have seen a seagull break thru a planes cockpit windshield so imagine what a phantom could do. Imaging the LAWSUIT to follow.
     
  11. ladykate

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    Yes, I believe you are right about the impact of a phantom on a light plane. It would be really bad and I think that was the underlying issue I wanted to emphasize - if people keep flying high - especially in congested areas - there will be an incident.

    However, you are wrong about a fireworks permit notifying pilots. NOTAMs do that but NOTAMs are not required for a fireworks display. In the current system, the Fire Marshal and the FAA are not connected. Strange but true.
     
  12. 2trickpony

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  13. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    That's one hell of a bird strike waiting to happen. Rules or not, if you want to fly that high, you had better be carrying a transponder!