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Phantom 2 Maximum Flight Altitude

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PhantomFanatic, Nov 24, 2014.

  1. PhantomFanatic

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    YES, I did search as I assumed this has been discussed before! Frankly, the search function hasn't turned up much at all.

    So, legalities aside, what IS the maximum altitude? Unless there is some software limitation, the only one that I can see at play would be the WiFi signal. I've read reviews that said the maximum altitude is VERY high. So how high is high?!

    p.s. No desire to orbit, I'm just analytical! Plus, no air, no lift and I don't have ceramic tile for re-entry. But, higher altitude video/pictures does interest me.
     
  2. ElGuano

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    Unless something has changed in the firmware, if you are not in a restricted flight zone, and don't have a max height set, you can go up until you lose RC signal. I don't think there is a barometer or GPS based limiter.
     
  3. SteveMann

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    If you are flying a programmed mission, you could go straight up until you run out of battery.

    While the FAA would like for you to stay below 400 ft AGL, that is only a recommendation. If you want to stay legal, when away from an airport, the airspace from the surface to 1200 ft AGL is Class G. From there to 18,000 ft MSL is Class E airspace, the least controlled airspace in the USA. No communications with ATC are required in Class G or Class E airspace. "Rules governing VFR flight have been adopted to assist the pilot in meeting the responsibility to see and avoid other aircraft. Minimum flight visibility and distance from clouds required for VFR flight are contained in 14 CFR Section 91.155" (Airman's Information Manual, Section 3 - Class G Airspace). A Mode C transponder is required in all Class A, B, and C airspace, within 30 miles of primary Class B airspace airports, and anytime you're above 10,000 feet.

    I think the correct question is "what is the absolute ceiling of the Phantom"? The absolute ceiling is the highest altitude at which an aircraft can sustain level flight. My guess is that because the props lose efficiency as the altitude increases, it would be a struggle to reach 10,000 ft.

    Any Phantom pilots in Leadville, Colorado (10,152 ft MSL)? They could answer the question easily.
     
  4. PhantomFanatic

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    Thank you SteveMann,

    Yes, I phrased my question incorrectly. Having flown a lot, I'm aware that the atmosphere's density decreases with altitude. 10,000 feet is no problem for single prop planes, but I have no idea how to figure it out for these propellers.

    Now that I think about it, the perfect question is: WHAT IS THE HIGHEST YOU HAVE FLOWN YOUR PHANTOM?

    Excuse the all caps, I wanted to put that question out there without submitted another post.
     
  5. Meta4

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  6. PhantomFanatic

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    Thanks Meta4! Wow! I wonder if the maximum height was the limit of WiFi? If so, one could amplify the signal, but 13K is high enough for me. However, wait for me to break the record!....
     
  7. ElGuano

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    That's high from an altitude perspective (ASL) but not particularly from an ascent perspective (AGL). The Phantom can definitely lift well above 10k ft altitude, but the operator there was probably no more than 100m below in any of those shots.

    The effective range of the transmitter/receiver (not wifi per se, but 2.4ghz radio) is between 1-2km. So you can definitely get it way up from where you take off.
     
  8. PhantomFanatic

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    Yes, 2.4Ghz is very popular for things such as video transmission, cordless phones, etc., but usually 4 channels is what is available. I refer to it as WiFi as both 2.4Ghz and 5.8Ghz are used for such. But, your point is valid. Being an amateur radio operator, I believe it is within our frequency spread. So, many uses.

    We bounce signals off of the moon at such frequencies, due to a dish left on the moon from an Apollo mission. Technically, if I wanted to, I could operate RC craft in ham only frequencies. Many moons ago, I operated RC at 50Mhz, when 27Mhz was the common frequencies.

    Thanks to technology advances, we can do all that we do!
     
  9. ElGuano

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    Ah, I see where you're coming from. FYI, different Phantoms utilize different frequencies for control and video. Standard Phantoms and P2s use 2.4ghz for RC control, and depending on the receiver/transmitter used, can have 7, 14, or 20+ discrete channels. The Phantom Vision series literally uses 2.4ghz WiFi (as in you connect your smartphone to it via WiFi) to establish a wireless video link, and rc control frequency is 5.8ghz. That's why I differentiate wifi from generic radio control--you can actually exceed your wifi signal and lose video/telemetry, but still have full control of the model on the 5.8ghz radio link :)
     
  10. Happyflyer

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    I know what you mean. First time at my house and shot video at 200 feet and thought that was fantastic. But when at 600 feet, the video was much more than fantastic. Wow! What you can see from up there! Just be sure at 200 feet you look all over for airplanes first, then pop up.
     
  11. docbucey

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    I just did a flight with mine. 250 AGL to 300 AGL is as high as you want to take the Phantom 2 probably the max altitude i would take any phantom. the Density Atmosphere gets to thin and the drone can become way to unresponsive for smooth good flight. now thats my opinion from the flight i did at greater than 200 feet
     
    #11 docbucey, Oct 20, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2016
  12. Mark The Droner

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    I see.

    Note that the posts in this thread are very much outdated.

    Welcome to the site!
     
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  13. RC Madman

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    This was funny! I was like when is that thing going to start climbing and I figured out that the guy thought that being high up in the mountains was the same as being high up AGL.
     
  14. djphantom2015

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    Dji can develop special propellers and it can fly up to Mount everest.
     
  15. CactusJackSlade

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    My P3 flew pretty easily at Loveland Pass in Colorado @ 12,000. I was frankly pretty amazed. The only reason I did not do a "full flight" is that it was blowing like stink (25+ with gusts) so I only did a very short run, 3-4 minutes.
     
  16. docbucey

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    The post you replied to is older I would hope no one on here recommends lying over 400 feet AGL for professional use or 300 feet personal use as that is not a recommendation that is a law and you will get fined if found to be over 300 feet Above Ground Level while not rated by the FAA to do so or flight over 400 feet unless it is a flight emergency. 12,000 feet of colorado pass is MSL and there is no limits to MSL as long as AGL is within 400 feet and you are not in class A airspace
     
  17. docbucey

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    UPDATE: it is now law. personal hobby flight 300 ft that is it no higher no lower and stay away from flight over people period. That is part 101. Part 107 you are rated to fly professional 400 feet unless it is an emergency those are above Ground level (AGL0 not sea level (MSL) the rule is clear your max altitude is AGL 300 feet
     
  18. Mark The Droner

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    docbucey - I think you might want to take a closer look at Part 101