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P2 Battery

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by glennbalsam, Feb 14, 2014.

  1. glennbalsam

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    I've just had my p2 battery arrive making me the proud owner of 2. I didn't get any instructions with the first but the instructions with the second didn't really relate to the battery? After destroying a brand new 2.2 lipo because know one told me not to run it to low I'm worried I may mess this p2 battery up. Is there any hard and fast rules when and how to charge the new p2. Obviously after paying a ridiculous price for it I want to maintain the optimum charge and use rate.
    Incidentally why aren't they nmh and have smart chargers that condition the battery and get rid of the memory lock? Seems like we have gone backwards in the battery technology?
     
  2. markab

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    They are lithium polymer batteries and I would say in battery chemistry terms are more advanced than nmh.

    Also each battery contains the charging and balancing circuitry (partly why they are so expensive), when you charge the battery it is conditioned in line with how a li-po needs to be charged.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, I generally fly to no less than 20% to ensure a safe landing. if you are not using them for long periods fly until around 40% then store in a cool dry place.
     
  3. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    LiPo is waaaaay better than NiMH. How did you kill your battery?
     
  4. glennbalsam

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    We'll I bought a complete fly system and this is my first. The FOV came with the Lipo battery but I never knew if you let it run down to far it would not recharge! That's why I want to be careful with the p2 battery as they are £120. Just seems that if these things don't have a built in meter how are you to know if it's gone beyond charging? Only thing I can think is to have a voltage meter to measure the bottom limit. And I still don't know what that is!!
    Just all seems a bit old fashioned?
     
  5. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    The P2 battery has a built-in controller. Note the P2 will decrease throttle gain when the voltage drops below 10.6V in attempt to prepare for landing. You'll want to land before that happens. And there are two levels of battery warnings before that. I don't know what it does as voltage continues to drop but I think you'd be hard pressed to run it down to the point of damaging it. You FPV battery sounds like it had no such safe guards.
     
  6. ElGuano

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    I think you misunderstand current battery technology. Current lithium chemistry batteries have substantially higher energy density than NiMH, and have protections and characteristics that make them very beneficial, including safe usage in parallel configurations, something you shouldn't do with NiMH. The smart charger is built into the P2 battery, it has charging, balancing, and discharge protection built in, as well as continuos monitoring of battery health. It's a state of the art battery by all standards. And it does have a gauge - each of the four lights gives you a rough estimate of remaining charge, and you can always plug the Phantom into your computer to get a full voltage/% readout of remaining battery charge.

    You'll be happy to know that there's no "memory" with these batteries (nor with li-ion or NiMH either). That was a bygone artifact of the NiCad days.

    Sorry you lost a 2200mah battery to over-discharge, that's one of the things you have be careful of. I'd respectfully suggest that there's an element of personal responsibility involved here; maybe "nobody told you" about the danger, but ultimately you are yourself responsible for reading the manual and being familiar with the limits and care of your equipment, and falling back on what a salesperson or mentor or internet board tells you is simply not going to get you to a point of really becoming an informed pilot. Anyone who's been in RC for more than a few weeks picks up a bit on battery care and conditioning, by necessity. Without attributing blame, I'd just suggest that you spend some time reading up and getting more familiar with lipo batteries--a little knowledge will definitively help you keep them operating well for along time!

    I'll also say that would be beneficial to avoid the somewhat intuitive practice of always keeping your lipos fully charged. That's actually not very good for them, and it's recommended that you keep them at ~50-60% (~3.80v) for long-term storage.
     
  7. glennbalsam

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    Great advice thanks for that. I did not get any instructions with my Lipo as it was all fitted and ready to fly. The guy didn't even send a battery charger but now I have one and the new battery its all working fine. Because of the price of these things though maybe I would of expected a warning on the side of the battery about running to low!
    Would a meter work in this case or is it just a case of charging it every time I fly the P2 for 20 mins?