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Other regulations that might be a guide.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by hcameron, May 29, 2014.

  1. hcameron

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    I am copying this from a posting in the "licensed pilots thread"

    I believe that the FAA might get creative in their approach to drones and I hope it is similar to how they see ultralights. In the ultralight world the FAA says "...it should be emphasized that the individual ultralight operator's support and compliance with national self-regulation programs is essential to the FAA's continued policy of allowing industry self-regulation in these areas." There are minimal regulations regarding ultralight vehicles or ultralight vehicle pilots. (different than ultralight aircraft) The definition of ultralight is the key. (weight, engine size, load capacity) A 2,000 pound drone carrying a payload of 200lbs is a bit different than a Phantom. Being smart in flying and having a self regulating industry is huge.

    Regarding altitude

    The model rocket industry might be a guide. Model rockets can travel into controlled airspace. The FAA gets a bit concerned when this happens. Flying drones very high could end up with similar guidelines. Probably not where we want to go. Here is more info.

    Waivers from the FAA are required to fly High Power Rockets weighing more than 3.3lbs and/or flying or greater than 4.4 ounces of propellant. While anyone may apply to the FAA for a waiver, this process is normally handled by a rocketry club officer, often the Launch Director. When granting waivers, the FAA reviews the normal use of the airspace for which a waiver has been requested to determine the feasibility of rerouting airplanes while launches are being held. Waivers to high altitudes are most readily granted for airspace that is not heavily used therefore, launch sites with high waivers are often many miles from large cities and airline traffic patterns. Waivers are granted in MSL or altitude above mean sea level.
     
  2. hcameron

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    I am currently in Warsaw Poland and realized my comments are very US centric. What are some of the international regs that might be a guide?
     
  3. IrishSights

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    The UK CAA regulations might be a good guide. The Information Notice link probably gives the best summary of the CAA regs. The main ANO is deep!

    RELAVENT CAA DOCUMENTS
    The main law document is the Air Navigation Order (ANO) - http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/cap 393 final.pdf

    The FPV Exemption ORS4 No.1011- http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/ORS4 No. 1011 Small Unmanned Aircraft.pdf

    Unmanned Aircraft Operations Guidance - [url=https://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP722.pdf]https://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP722.pdf [‎/url]

    Latest Information Notice - http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/InformationNotice2014081.pdf

    My plain Phantom pilots UK CAA guide post is here:
    http://phantompilots.com/viewtopic.php?t=14532

    Sent from my Galaxy Note 8
     
  4. jadebox

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    I fly high power rockets and I have to say that our working relationship with the FAA has been much nicer, easier, and more productive than with other government agencies.

    Although safety is, of course, the FAA's primary goal, they obviously recognize a right to recreational use of the air space. They could have said, "no, you can't punch holes in the sky with your large rockets." Instead, they worked with us to craft reasonable regulations that ensure that we can continue to enjoy our hobby. They actually reduced the regulation on us a few years ago in response to our excellent safety record. In addition to routinely granting waivers to allow us to launch larger rockets when we are sure there are no aircraft in the area, they have, on occasion, routed air traffic around organized launches.

    The FAA, like all federal agencies, is required to collect and review public comments on proposed rules and regulations. Unlike some of the other agencies we have dealt with, the FAA actually listens to the comments and tries to ensure that all the interested parties are respected.

    So, I'm not overly concerned about the FAA enacting any onerous regulation of our hobby.

    -- Roger
     
  5. ianwood

    ianwood Taco Wrangler
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    ...when hell freezes over!