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New Jersey State Parks

Discussion in 'News' started by csmithphoto, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. csmithphoto

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    I was flying in a state park today and was told by a park ranger that I couldn't fly there. I was a little skeptical but i was polite and left. I researched afterwards and found that all new jersey state park service properties are prohibited to all UAV use and even government operations will need approval. I hadn't heard anything about this previously and I was wondering if anyone else has; i think this is a fairly new regulation.

    I'm really irritated by this because it's getting to the point where someone looking to photograph nature is going to have nowhere to fly, at least in the east. Sure, out west there are plenty of wild lands that aren't owned by a government agency but things just keep getting worse. I expect my FAA approval soon because I have received a docket number and don't foresee any reason to be denied and at this point I am wondering if I will be able to use my quads as much as I expected. I know that we aren't a very tight group and don't have much pull but I am thinking commercial operators need to form some sort of an organization and from there we can draft our own regulations and present them to legislators - self regulating is the best way to go and will avoid lawmakers who know nothing about our industry taking draconian measures against us. Most industries do this and we should do the same.
     
  2. DAP-UAV

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    Not a bad idea, commercial UAV pilots unite!
     
  3. Beario

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    I was flying in PA and got a similar reception. He did inform me that the state website list the parks where I can go to fly. A lot of the concerns are about people getting injured. I do agree with what you are saying though it really seems like less and less places to go fly.
     
  4. Jeff48920

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  5. davis

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    yep, government will dictate where and when you can fly. you'll be grouped with the other RC guys in a rec park.
    commercial use will require permits and fees.
     
  6. Mario_SB

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    They are cracking down everywhere! Same goes for California. In the City of Los Angeles you can't even fly at your local park. Check this out!

    "Within the limits of any park or other City-owned Harbor Department designated and controlled property within the City of Los Angeles: No person shall land, release, take off or fly any balloon, except children toy balloons not inflated with any flammable material, helicopter, parakite, hang glider, aircraft or powered models thereof, except in areas specifically set aside therefore."
     
  7. DrJoe

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    You can't launch and land at the park. The FAA controls the airspace.
     
    ScatSpeak likes this.
  8. mmtphoto

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    This is getting a little ridiculous, and part of the problem is people who push limits and fly in areas that are not safe or who ignore the FAA's 'guidelines'. It is just dumb to fly out of line of sight, over 400 feet, too close to roads, crowds and buildings (that you do not own or have no authority). The media is just looking for examples of what they will label dangerous or reckless use of a UAV, and the facts are usually ignored so the story sells.

    The Empire State Building in NYC story is a good example-initial report had the drone going up to the 40th floor and 'crashing' onto a landing on the 35th floor. Now, a week plus later, it comes out the drone probably was not more than a toy drone and weighed less than a half pound, and it went to the 6th floor and landed harmlessly on the fifth floor overhang causing no damage. But the story has been sensationalized to the point that politicians feel the need to make regulations that infringe on our rights to enjoy what is a fledgling hobby/sport and industry. Another story just surfaced about Hillary Clinton not being allowed out of her limo at an event in Chicago because some genius across from the venue she was attending was flying a drone, wanting to get a shot of her arrival. Dumb.

    Since I read that some 700.000 of these things were sold last year, I think it would be wise for some deep pocketed groups try to solicit money to lobby for OUR rights-if we do not figure out a way to band together and promote our rights, we will have in our closets drones we can not use anymore. But that also requires that we police ourselves-if you do something stupid it will affect us all, so the libertarians who harp on rights of freedom while telling tales of flying BLOS 2,3 plus miles need to be discouraged by others and not congratulated for their exploits.

    I'd pay dues to a group that lobbied for basic rights and I would pledge to subscribe to established rules and regulations. I'd also agree to gain certification and obtain insurance for my participation as long as I knew that the local governments or police could not arbitrarily decide to impose or fabricate a regulation or statute on the spot to suit their mood. I have paid taxes for over 50 years so being told I cannot fly over a state or national park is really an insult IMO-I can go to Fairmont Park here in Philadelphia and toss a football, throw a frisbee. baseball, set up a portable barbecue, even walk while texting in downtown in a crowd, or risk getting killed by a bike messenger, but God forbid I go to a park and fly my drone safely, away from buildings, crowds of people (common sense here people, NOT near crowds of people).

    Here is a chance to solve our immediate problem-peer pressure and an advocacy organization for UAV participants. It would require commitment of members, officers, and of course money. I have enough invested in this so far that I'd contribute to try to make this better, because the fact is the press look for idiots or people of questionable judgement to display as examples of us all and this is going to get worse.

    Unless we figure out a way to advocate for ourselves, this is going to be very difficult if not impossible to do going forward.
     
  9. CactusJackSlade

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    Totally true..... Initially I thought Amazon was going to be a good advocate... but they would like to have the skies to themselves and have not advocated for consumers. Also if DJI and the larger consumer "drone" (I hate that word) companies do not start advocating a lot harder there will be no place to fly and no reason to buy their products...
     
  10. LK8472

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    Same in FL. No taking off or landing in state parks unless from designated landing areas...spoiler, there are no designated areas. To be fair many parks are bird sanctuaries and nesting grounds so I understand some parks but a blanket ban is making it very difficult to get good nature shots.


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