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ND Filters in Auto?

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Rob Ford, May 10, 2016.

  1. Rob Ford

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    I am going to film over a Private Golf Club course for a friend of mine, my question is, for ease should I use auto camera settings or use manual settings to change the ISO etc. Also, although I use a ND 8 filter in bright sunlight in manual, should I use it if I use Auto settings?

    To put it another way, what is the best way to film over grass, Auto or manual/ ND filter or not ?

    Thanks for any help offered.

    Rob
     
  2. msinger

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    You'll get the best results if you shoot manual and get the ISO down as close to 100 as possible.
     
  3. DaveB68

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    I generally use auto. I usually shoot at 1080p 60 and on bright sunny days the camera usually selects ISO 100 / 200 and around 120/sec which is about right. That's with an ND8.
     
  4. m0j0

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    No use should not allow the camera to control ISO automatically.


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  5. Not A Speck Of Cereal

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    Okay, the double-negatives are confusing me. Is that your way of saying "Nobody should ever use manual ISO settings"?

    Aside from that, and in respect to photography in general (not just from a UAV or a moving position), that statement couldn't be further from the truth, regardless of how you construe it. In other words, there are places for both fully manual as well as fully automatic ISO control by a photo/video device.
     
  6. m0j0

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    The comment I make is not from a photographers view. My comments are related to video on this camera that uses a fixed aperture. With these factors I would not use auto ISO. That is my perspective. You can do whatever you like. For me, manually setting all the parameters yields the most professional results. Results that I can than match to different cameras etc.
     
  7. msinger

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    My comment was assuming the OP is shooting video too. If shooting photos, auto without an ND filter should work just fine.
     
  8. YoshiK1

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    Auto ISO will make the camera instantly increase the ISO when it sees dark spots. I'm not sure how the P3 camera work but I'd assume that it'll take a light reading of the whole scene and work out the average amount of light then adjust the ISO accordingly. This tends to be how a DSLR works on auto modes.

    High ISO introduces noise to the video or photos and it doesn't look nice. The lower the ISO the cleaner it is. Also it can over expose whites and you can't pull back all of detail because it's not recorded by the camera. You've more chance of pulling back the darks to the correct exposure although these too can end up not being recorded if they're pitch black but that's more unlikely than over exposure. Correcting this in post will still introduce noise but not on the same scale of a higher ISO.


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    #8 YoshiK1, May 10, 2016
    Last edited: May 10, 2016
  9. Phantom-Four

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    It all depends on what you want to deliver. If you don't mind inconsistent footage then by all means, go for auto. If you want a better end product go manual.
     
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  10. m0j0

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    Exactly, for video footage you don't want the camera choosing exposure settings it yields results that you can't easily correct in post. Then again, I'm a bit **** about video. I'm an event videographer and one thing I have found is that it is almost impossible to match footage with auto settings enabled. In fact I learned this on my first test shoot. Which was the absolute last time I used auto anything for video. Photos that's another story.
     
    Phantom-Four likes this.