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Much Appreciated

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by DeadGrunt, Feb 29, 2016.

  1. DeadGrunt

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    All... Thank you all for the help in the past. Have a P3A, and probably watched all your videos on the past. Everything from WTF, to ????? did I do, as well as every YouTube one possible. Have had the police asking about it, but was prepared, it was registered, and no issues in the past. No fly zones, and "B4UFly," were always checked. Never have done anything crazy, just learning the hobby, and trying to promote the art.

    So, I was flying over the river 198ft AGL (still have not ventured above 200 feet AGL), with some gusty winds, and got the low battery warning. I had put a battery in with about 18%, because it was just to go straight up and try different camera settings, etc, etc., and just snap photos while yawing. Then, several female joggers were running on the cement path, and of course, bravado took over. Minutes later, beep, beep, beep, battery was low and RTH was critical. I was about 1/2 mile away and it was the first "panic attack," I ever had. I was flying, and forgetting, and I skittered softly down the winds current without monitoring the battery levels.

    Then, I realized if I let it return to home, it was going to waste battery power elevating, and was quicker for me to cancel it, and fly straight home. Many posts said to take it easy and do not freak out, and I heeded your advice. The aircraft is forgetting, but the last thing I wanted to do was panic, and have a lawn dart splashing in the mud.

    My advice to anyone new on here is swallow your pride, and learn from the people on here. Heed their advice and fly smart. Instead of investing ion pretty little stickers and artwork right away, be safe. Get a Gimbal guard, prop protectors, and update everything to include batteries when there is an update. But, do not panic. My first flight was straight up, and a gentle flight, and just learned how it responded. Do not haul ***, and then lock the air brakes up to see how fast you can stop. Think of it as a first date with some of the joggers that I was flying adjacent to, slow - and - easy. And LISTEN to the smart people on here. Thanks everyone for all your input, and for all you new pilots, the best thing about a successful first flight is, you will never have a "crashed on first flight posting, or video."
     
  2. alokbhargava

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    Every experience is a new experience. Thanks for sharing with us.
     
  3. DeadGrunt

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    Thank you Sir
     
  4. John Locke

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    "......it was just go straight up and try different camera settings" is a lot different than "I was about 1/2 mile away" and "198" in the air" You're really asking for trouble with this flight behavior on an 18% battery. Holy smokes, I won't fly on a battery less than 25% at the end of a flight that started at 100%. And you're taking off with 18%, practically a dead battery? Really? I'm surprised the Go app allowed that, did you not get a warning from the Go App?

    Some friendly advice:
    1. Never start a flight with less than 95% battery, no matter what the objective. Try to top off all batteries the night before you fly.
    2. Setup your Go App to display the cell voltage near your Percent level in the upper right corner. When the Voltage reads 3.6V, be close to ending your flight, not a half mile away.
    3. After you reach 3.6V on the battery, never give it more than half throttle and plan on landing soon.
    4. Set your RTH accordingly to the area you're flying. Look around, set the RTH level. Don't set it to 300' and call it good for everywhere, because when you absolutely need it to work you want it to be useful, and not a hinder your objective of a safe RTH.

    I'm really surprised you didn't have a bigger problem during the flight you described.
     
    #4 John Locke, Feb 29, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
  5. DeadGrunt

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    It was playing with fire and experience is the best teacher for sure. And you elaborated to a certain extent why I was thanking everyone. I was going to panic and brought it right back to me. They were fully charged the night before and I flew it and then went through my three other batteries. I planned on just flying up and taking pictures and got side-tracked. There was no issue with surroundings, but my point was when the RTH initiates, it is going to ascend in altitude, and I cancelled it and flew straight home. I did have the wind at its back coming back, so I am sure that helped. Thanks for the reply and maybe me getting lucky, will help someone else avoid that "Runner interference." ;)
     
  6. John Locke

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    Thank the wind for your good luck getting home. As for the RTH, you stated you were at 198'. The only way the bird will ascend is if you had it set to a higher elevation. If you are higher than the RTH setting, it will stay at the current elevation until it gets to the home point, then descend. What's your setting for RTH height?

    However, in low battery situations a P3 won't RTH if it senses a critically low battery. It should auto land, (guys, correct me if I'm wrong) and you have to fight to get back home. So in this case, I believe the RTH fear of ascending is overruled by the threat of auto landing other than at home. I'm surprised RTH initiated, usually it's auto land that initiates with critically low batteries.
     
  7. DeadGrunt

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    I am very grateful for the wind behind it. And lucky is much better than good!!! My RTH limit is set at 90 meters (295 feet), so it would have ascended. I will chalk this one up to luck, and make **** sure it doesn't happen again. As for me, I am glad it came back, and aren't going down that "slippery slope" again. Beats the hell out of having it just stop flying and wondering why.