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Max Battery Temps

Discussion in 'Pro/Adv Discussion' started by Heisnuts, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. Heisnuts

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    My max battery temp after a long flight has been just over 111 degrees Fahrenheit. I am wondering if that is in line with what others are finding after a longer flight.
     
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  2. NotARubicon

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    My max was 127°F .. I think that's pushing it, but curious what others' max is.
     
  3. Heisnuts

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    That's a good question. At what temp is the battery getting too hot?
     
  4. NotARubicon

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    According to HealthDrones 127 is in the yellow.. Looks like a way to go before getting into the danger zone.. But I'm sure an expert will let us know.
     
  5. eaglegoaltender

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    I'm no expert but from what I have learned with using these types of batteries in my work equipment, is LiPo batteries like to be warm - well hot really prior to use, 75'f - 90'f (roughly 25 - 30'c).

    A max temperature for the Phantom LiPo type battery is in the range of 60'c (140''f) - beyond that and you will have issues.
     
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  6. Mark The Droner

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    Yes. Some so-called battery expert posted an informational thread 5-6 weeks ago and in the OP he was saying 140 F is the point where the battery will become dangerously volatile.
     
  7. Rumbaar

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    My hottest is 55c, in the Australian summer. When I first got the drone, that was extreme weather conditions on me and the drone.
     
  8. Mark The Droner

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    You didn't get a warning at 55 C? You'd think the firmware would give us a warning when the battery gets too hot. We get one when it's too cold... but I guess it's okay to let our aircraft blow up in the sky?
     
  9. eaglegoaltender

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    Yikes that is extremely hot - I don't imagine you flew for a very long time at that temp - lucky it didn't melt or swell and jam inside the Phantom. LiPo batteries lose efficiency when used at extreme heat for an extended period of time.

    They are very susceptible to rapid changes in temperature and pressure - hence the reason they are NOT allowed on an airplane in baggage compartment due to this being a uncontrolled environment for temp changes and pressure (only allowed as carry on - and must be in a safe LiPo carrying bag - 1 battery per/bag).

    Photo - end result of an exploded LiPo that was in the baggage compartment of a plane...................................chart below photo showing "suggested" working temperatures and effects.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. neven

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    I got 50C battery temp when outside temp was just above 0C. I went some 3.000m away and didn't notice 30-50kmh tail winds at 120m altitude. I activated manual RTH to get back at 70% battery and it was barely moving at 1-3m/s now with strong headwind. I gave full throttle and got no more then 5m/s. Battery % was dropping faster then ever and at one point I tought I'm not going to make it. Fortunately it landed on HP with 10% left. **** that battery felt hot in my freezing (and shaking) hands. If ambient temp were higher I don't think it would make it back due to overheat.


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  11. eaglegoaltender

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    Yikes - close call Neven, glad you made it back safely. Yup, when you leave for a flight with a high tail wind then have to fight that to come home you will be putting a huge load on the batteries and higher the load the higher the temps will get.

    Lets do the math - lol............

    High head wind + cold ambient air temperature + full throttle + distance to home point = recipe for possible disaster ( great job getting her home safely).
     
  12. flyNfrank

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    I highest mine reached for whatever reason was 143 degrees unless the reading was wrong. Knowing how I fly I never hold the aircraft under a lot of battery stress, meaning like flying in such away the aircraft is in a load situation. Flying a long distance at full throttle would be something that raises heat. And climbing straight up for long period would be a heavy load, and probably one of the fastest ways to make the temp raise.
     
  13. neven

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    Well it was lousy job to get in such a situation and no skills required to get out of it. Pure luck :)



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